Can a Redesigned Child Support System Do Better?

This Institute for Research on Poverty brief is a summary of an impact and benefit-cost analysis of the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration Program (CSPED). Participating parents were given additional employment services to support economic self-sufficiency with the goal of increasing child support compliance. Analysis findings concluded that satisfaction with the child support system improved substantially for noncustodial parents when a customized approach was utilized; there were modest gains in child support enforcement compliance, earnings, and parenting. While short-term implementation costs outweighed benefits, it was expected that there would be more benefits than costs in the longer term.
Record Type: 
Report
Publication Date: 
July, 2019
Date: 
July 2019
Source: 
Partner Resources
Topics/Subtopics: 
  • Employment
  • Supportive Services
    • Child Support
  • Special Populations
    • Non-custodial Parents
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