Challenges to Employment/Special Populations

This section from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families offers key welfare information on addressing challenges to employment and special populations of low-income families.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATIONS

This section provides resources related to those who are hard to employ and/or those experiencing barriers to self-sufficiency.

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General Topic

HHS, DOL and HUD Issue Joint Letter Encouraging Summer Youth Employment Efforts, April 2014

The Departments of Labor (DOL), Health and Human Services (DHHS), and Housing and Urban Development (HUD) have issued a letter to their respective customers encouraging partnerships among the network of state and local youth service and workforce development providers, human service agencies, and Public Housing Agencies to develop summer jobs programs for needy and at-risk youth that provide employment, educational experiences, and essential skills such as financial literacy and time management.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofa/resource/hhs-dol-and-hud-issue-joint-letter-encouraging-summer-youth-employment-efforts


The Plummeting Labor Market Fortunes of Teens and Young Adults, March 2014

The Brookings Institution recently released an interactive tool that takes a comprehensive look at the state of the job market for America's youth in the nation for each of the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas. Users are able to select a city from the dropdown menu and then view data about the specific employment rates, disconnected youth, race/ethnicity, education levels, and poverty status. Interested users are also able to download this information. The report also includes a number of strategies to reduce youth joblessness and labor force underutilization.

For more information, please see: http://www.brookings.edu/research/interactives/2014/labor-market-metro-areas-teens-young-adults?utm_campaign=Brookings+Brief&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=12223980&_hsenc=p2ANqtz--3


Reentry Matters: Strategies and Successes of Second Chance Act Grantees Across the United States, November 2013

With over 95 percent of people in the nation's State prisons expected to be released at some point, officials at all levels of government recognize the need for initiatives to support the successful reentry of these individuals to their communities. The program snapshots released in this publication by the Council of State Governments illustrate the positive impact reentry initiatives can have by focusing on areas vital to successful reintegration back into the community, including employment, education, mentoring, and substance abuse and mental health treatment. Also highlighted are programs that address the needs of a particular population, such as women, youth and their families, and Tribal communities. Representing a wide range of populations served, these programs also demonstrate the diversity of approaches that can address recidivism and increase public safety.

For more information, please see: http://csgjusticecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/ReentryMatters.pdf


The Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP): Launching a Nationwide Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Effort, November 2013

The Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) was authorized by Congress to reduce teen pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections, and associated risk behaviors. Grantees across the country had flexibility in how they would implement their programs. This report is the first report from the PREP evaluation sponsored by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation and conducted by Mathematica Policy Research. Authors interviewed State grantee officials to document the program decisions made across 44 States and Washington DC in designing the program. Among the key findings, researchers found that many of the programs are evidence-based and targeting high-risk youth. Additionally, States have developed their programs in different ways to educate on abstinence and contraception. The evaluation will include an additional round of interviews in 2014, performance management data analysis, and an analysis of program impacts using random assignment across four to five sites.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/prep_eval_design_survey_report_102213.pdf


Feel the Heat: the Unrelenting Challenge of Young Black Male Unemployment, October 2013

This report from the Center of Law and Social Policy (CLASP) proposes several strategies to help turn the table for the thousands of young black men who are under- and unemployed. The report reflects on the current labor market situation of young black men and on policies and practices that can be leveraged to dramatically improve their labor market status.

For more information, please see: http://www.clasp.org/admin/site/publications/files/Feel-the-Heat_Web.pdf


New Guidance on Child Trafficking to Child Welfare Systems, September 2013

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families released two major announcements after the White House convened two events on human trafficking for national civil society leaders. In this announcement, Assistant Secretary Sheldon released new guidance on child trafficking to child welfare systems and runaway and homeless youth programs.

For more information, please see: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/blog/2013/09/much-anticipated-child-welfare-guidance-on-human-trafficking-released


ORR Webinar: Providing Coordinated Human Services to Refugees and Immigrants through Specialized Service Units, September 2013

The Office of Refugee Resettlement hosted a Webinar entitled "Providing Coordinated Human Services to Refugees and Immigrants through Specialized Service Units." This free Webinar provided an opportunity to hear about specialized service units which are collaborations between ORR and refugee and immigrant serving programs and TANF programs designed to improve placements and services for low-income refugees and immigrants. Tom Medina from the Washington Department of Social and Health Services, Economic Services Administration, Office of Refugee and Immigrant Services presented on Washington's service delivery model and partner agencies, highlighted available services to low-income refugees and immigrants including TANF, English as a Second Language, job training, case management and many more essential services. The webinar emphasized lessons learned for effectively facilitating partnerships and reducing barriers to ORR and refugee and immigrant program collaboration with TANF, workforce development, and other agencies.

Click Here to View Webinar Slides [PDF - 379 KB]

Click Here to View Webinar Transcript [PDF - 260 KB]

Click Here to Listen to the Webinar Audio [WMV - 12,661 KB]

Click Here to View Webinar Q&A [PDF - 258 KB]


The Parenting Gap, September 2013

Brookings released findings from a study from the Center on Children and Families that found that the parenting gap is a big factor in the opportunity gap, and that the chances of upward social mobility are lower for children with parents struggling to create a supportive and stimulating home environment. Children with parents that are able to achieve this are more likely to succeed at all the critical life stages, while parents that need additional supports require policies that invest in opportunity and equality.

To view this paper, please see: http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/2013/09/09-parenting-gap-social-mobility-wellbeing-reeves

and: http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/papers/2013/09/09%20parenting%20gap%20social%20mobility%20wellbeing%20reeves/09%20parenting%20gap%20social%20mobility%20wellbeing%20reeves.pdf


$5 Million in Grants Awarded to Assist Veterans, August 2013

The U.S. Department of Labor's Veterans' Employment and Training Service announced the award of 22 grants, totaling more than $5 million, to provide around 1,900 homeless female veterans and veterans with families with job training to help them succeed in civilian careers. The grants are being awarded under the department's Homeless Female Veterans and Veterans with Families Program. The services provided by grantees will include job placement, on-the-job and classroom training, career counseling, life skills and money management mentoring, as well as help in finding housing.

For more information, please see: http://www.dol.gov/opa/media/press/vets/vets20131575.htm


Webcast Recording: U.S. Refugee Resettlement System, July 2013

The Workforce3 One Web site posted information on a webinar that provided an overview of the U.S. Refugee Resettlement System, starting from selection to resettlement in the United States. During the webinar, the speakers discussed who is considered a U.S. refugee, how someone becomes a refugee, and how organizations can employ these refugees.

For more information, please see: https://www.workforce3one.org/view/3001319850342568341/info


Webinar: Using Intensive Vocationally-Focused ESL to Fast-Track Workforce Development Skills for Refugees, May 2013

The Office of Refugee Resettlement hosted a Webinar, "Using Intensive Vocationally-Focused ESL to Fast-Track Workforce Development Skills for Refugees." The Webinar provided an overview of the Vocational English as a Second Language Immersion Program (VIP) program. The VIP program is a collaboration between the San Francisco Human Services Agency (HSA) and the City College of San Francisco (CCSF). The Webinar highlighted the VIP's eighteen week intensive English language immersion program that is focused on teaching the vocabulary and the cultural norms of the work place.

View ORR Webinar PowerPoint [PDF - 867 KB]

View ORR Webinar Transcript [PDF - 239 KB]


Advancing the Well-Being and Self-Sufficiency of At-Risk Youth, March 2013

Produced as part of the Youth Demonstration Development project for the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, this report presents a conceptual framework for efforts to prepare at-risk youth for healthy adult functioning and self-sufficiency. The framework explains how we can build our knowledge about what works for at-risk youth, by implementing and testing research-informed interventions to promote youths' resilience and human capital. An issue brief summarizes the framework.

To view this report, please see: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com/publications/PDFs/family_support/YDD_fnlrpt.pdf

To view this issue brief, please see: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com/publications/PDFs/family_support/YDD_Framework_IB.pdf


Office of Family Assistance (OFA) TANF Program Policy: Drug Convictions, March 2013

A new question and answer has been posted to the Office of Family Assistance Web site (see Question two of the Q & A: Drug Convictions). This item responds to the question as to whether or not an individual with a felony drug conviction can receive TANF non-assistance services.

To view this Q & A, please see: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofa/resource/q-a-drug-convictions


The Employment Prospects of Formerly Incarcerated People and Off-the-Books Work, February 2013

The Institute of Research on Poverty (IRP) hosted Mr. Bryan Sykes, a sociologist at DePaul University, to talk about some of the barriers that former inmates encounter when trying to find work, as well as how the costs of incarceration disproportionately affect young African American men. He also talks about his work on off-the-books labor and how former inmates still face heavy discrimination to the informal economy.

Listen to the Podcast

Read the Transcript


A Guide to Evidence and Innovation, 2013

As an extension of their page, FindYouth.gov has provided a resource titled "A Guide to Evidence and Innovation." With more and more funding sources for youth programs requiring the implementation of evidence-based programs, this resource helps you know where to look and what to look for when trying to find an evidence-based program that fits your organization and population.

For more information, please see: http://evidence-innovation.findyouthinfo.gov/


Pathways for Youth: Draft Strategic Plan for Federal Collaboration, 2013

The Interagency Working Group on Youth Programs (Working Group) is comprised of twelve Federal departments and five Federal agencies that support activities that focus on youth. This report, Pathways for Youth, is a first step to help the partners address their common goals for youth, elevate strong models of youth programs, policies, and other supports, and articulate areas for future collaborative work with and for youth. The Working Group solicited input from a wide range of stakeholders, including young people, families, schools, nonprofit organizations, State Children's Cabinet directors, government organizations at the Federal, State, and local levels, and others. Several themes emerged from the input, which are crafted into a vision for youth. This vision acknowledges the importance of pathways to opportunity for youth that include meaningful connections and safe, healthy, and stable places to live, learn, and work. Pathways for Youth considers all youth, with an emphasis on the most vulnerable youth, particularly those who are disconnected from school, work, or family.

For more information, please see: http://www.findyouthinfo.gov/docs/Pathways_for_Youth.pdf


Reintegration After Deployment: Supporting Citizen Warriors and Their Families, 2013

A study released by the RAND Corporation addresses challenges that reserve component service members and their families face after deployment, and the factors that contribute to successful reintegration, a process that is critical to the well-being of the individual and their family. The report provides a series of recommendations for the U.S. Department of Defense.

For more information, please see: http://www.rand.org/pubs/research_briefs/RB9730.html


Trauma-Informed Care for Women Veterans Experiencing Homelessness: A Guide for Service Providers, 2013

The U.S. Department of Labor released a "Trauma Guide" that was created to address the psychological and mental health needs of women veterans. This guide is also a compilation of best practices aimed at improving effectiveness in engaging female veterans. Written for service providers, the guide offers observational knowledge and concrete guidelines for modifying practices with the goal of increasing re-entry outcomes.

For more information, please see: http://www.dol.gov/wb/trauma/WBTraumaGuide2011.pdf


Updated Data for Persons Defined as Economically Disadvantaged Youth and Adults, 2013

The U.S. Department of Labor, Employment & Training Administration has issued special tabulations of combined five-year samples (2006-2011 data) of the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey (ACS). These special tabulations include separate sets of tables for the nation, States, counties and other types of localities. The Workforce Investment Act (WIA) requires States to use data on economically disadvantaged youth and adults win their within-State allocation formulas.

For more information, please see: http://www.doleta.gov/budget/disadvantagedYouthAdults.cfm


Hit Hard but Bouncing Back: The Employment of Immigrants During the Great Recession and the Recovery, October 2012

The Urban Institute published a brief discussing the employment levels of immigrants during the great recession and the recovery. It discusses how employment is more sensitive to economic fluctuation for immigrants than for U.S. born workers, how immigrants suffered greater job losses than natives during the recession, but have enjoyed greater employment growth during the recovery, and that despite employment growth, neither group has made up the ground lost during the recession. Explanations of previous and current employment trends among immigrants and natives are further explained and assisted with graphical representations.

For more information, please see: http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412691-Hit-Hard-but-Bouncing-Back.pdf


New Online Workplace Flexibility Toolkit, October 2012

The Office of Disability Employment Policy launched the Workplace Flexibility Toolkit. This Toolkit makes more than 170 resources easily accessible for workers and job seekers with complex employment situations, such as parents with young children, single parents, family caregivers, mature workers, at-risk youth, ex-offenders, individuals with disabilities, veterans, and people with HIV/AIDS. Visitors may access case studies, fact and tip sheets, issue briefs, reports, articles, websites and a list of frequently asked questions. This Toolkit is funded by the ODEP in partnership with the department's Women's Bureau.

For more information, please see: http://www.dol.gov/opa/media/press/odep/ODEP20122014.htm


Economic Security for Extremely Vulnerable Families: Themes and Options for Workforce Development and Asset Strategies, September 2012

This report explores workforce and asset development strategies for improving the economic security of extremely vulnerable families that are facing major challenges beyond poverty. Evidence drawn from the authors' own research, review of relevant literature, and learning sessions conducted by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, suggests that programs can succeed at improving the skills and employability of extremely vulnerable parents and can increase their savings to help tide them through emergencies. The report also highlights opportunities to inform policy and support targeted research to advance this agenda.

To view this report, please see: http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412699-Economic-Security-for-Extremely-Vulnerable-Families.pdf


Transition from Prison to Community Initiative: Process Evaluation Final Report, September 2012

The Urban Institute in conjunction with the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) launched the Transition from Prison to the Community (TPC) initiative in 2001, recognizing the need to provide States with support and guidance in developing an effective reentry system to help prisoners prepare for their release, navigate their transition back to the community, and overcome short- and long-term barriers to reintegration. This model was implemented in a group of eight States from 2001 to 2009 and an extensive analysis on its findings was completed. This evaluation of the Transition from Prison to the Community initiative found improved collaboration among participating State agencies and their service provider partners and identified enhanced efforts to employ risk/needs assessments, assess program quality, and monitor performance. Developed and funded by the NIC, TPC provided States with support and guidance in preparing prisoners for release, facilitating their transition to the community, and overcoming barriers to reintegration.

For more information, please see: http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412690-Transition-from-Prison-to-Community-Initiative-Process-Evaluation-Final-Report.pdf


Education, Job Openings, and Unemployment in Metropolitan America, August 2012

The Brookings Institute published a paper that aimed to provide metro, State, and national policy makers with a clearer understanding of the specific problems facing metropolitan labor markets today. An analysis examining trends in the demand for educated labor, and an explanation on how the gap between education supply and demand is related to unemployment, is addressed. This study concludes with a discussion of the implications of these findings for public policy.

For more information, please see: http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/2012/08/29-education-gap-rothwell#M10420


Worker Displacement: 2009 -- 2011, August 2012

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported on August 24, 2012 that from January 2009 through December 2011, 6.1 million workers were displaced from jobs they had held for at least three years. This is down from the 6.9 million for the survey period covering January 2007 to December 2009. In January 2012, 56 percent of workers displaced from 2009-11 were reemployed, up by seven percentage points from the prior survey in January 2010.

For more information, please see: http://www.bls.gov/news.release/archives/disp_08242012.htm


The World at Work: Jobs, Pay and Skills for 3.5 Billion People, June 2012

The McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) recently released The World at Work: Jobs, Pay and Skill for 3.5 Billion People. This report analyzes the dramatic shifts in the global labor markets that have occurred over the last several decades, causing increasingly stark skill and wage gaps across the world. This report estimates future levels of college educated workers, as well as solutions to future employment barriers that may arise due to education. Labor supply and demand, labor gaps, and a global agenda for skills and jobs are also address in this report.

To view this full report, please see: http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/mgi/research/labor_markets/the_world_at_work


Recent Employment Patterns Among Parents, April 2012

This Research Brief, written by ASPE, analyzes quarterly data from the Current Population Survey- the nation's primary data collection instrument for labor force activity. Analyses of the employment patterns of persons with children under the age of eighteen show that they have largely mirrored the patterns of the rest of the labor force since the beginning of the most recent recession, with a decrease in employment. Findings also show an increase in the percent of couples with neither parent employed and an increase in the percent of single mothers who were neither employed nor living with an employed cohabiting partner.

For more information, please see: http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/12/EmploymentPatterns/rb.shtml


What Strategies Work for the Hard-to-Employ? Final Results of the Hard-to-Employ Demonstration and Evaluation Project and Selected Sites from the Employment Retention and Advancement Project, March 2012

The Enhanced Services for the Hard-to-Employ (HtE) Demonstration and Evaluation Project was a ten year study that evaluated innovative strategies aimed at improving employment and other outcomes for groups who face serious barriers to employment. The project was sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, with additional funding from the U.S. Department of Labor. This report describes the HtE programs and summarizes the final results for each program. Additionally, it presents information for three sites from the ACF-sponsored Employment Retention and Advancement (ERA) project where hard-to-employ populations were also targeted.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/strategies_work.pdf


Tips for Working with People Experiencing Homelessness, January 2012

The National Transitional Jobs Network (NTJN) released a report that focuses on the designing and implementing of transitional jobs (TJ) programs that serve individuals experiencing homelessness. This report is particularly beneficial for TJ practitioners looking to better serve their participants who are experiencing homelessness, homeless service providers considering TJ as a potential employment services model, and anyone interested in how the TJ model can be used to provide access to employment for people experiencing homelessness.

For more information, please see: http://www.scribd.com/doc/79391645/NTJN-Homelessness-Brief-Jan-2012-v2


Guide to Leading Policies, Practices and Resources: Supporting the Employment of Veterans and Military Families, 2012

Given employment challenges facing our nation's veterans, the "Guide to Leading Policies, Practices & Resources: Supporting the Employment of Veterans and Military Families" is the product of a collaborative effort of the Institute for Veterans and Military Families (IVMF) and more than 30 private sector employers and supporting organizations, whose activities are reflected throughout the report. Throughout the report, promising practices, lessons learned and innovations tied to the recruitment, assimilation, retention and advancement of vets in the workforce are shared. The guide represents a response to calls for a shared resource for American employers to adopt a strategic and sustainable approach to the advancement of veterans in the civilian workforce, and serves to advance employment and economic opportunities for vets and their families. The publication is one of the most comprehensive efforts to-date focused on providing actionable strategies and resources to advance the employment situation of the nation's veterans and military families.

For more information, please see: http://vets.syr.edu/pdfs/guidetoleadingpractices.pdf


Disconnected Families and TANF, November 2011

It is estimated that 20 to 25 percent of low-income single mothers are disconnected from both work and TANF, and up to 75 percent of this population face barriers to work. The Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, within the Administration for Children and Families, released this research brief on disconnected families and TANF. Since the inception of the TANF program in 1996, the “disconnected” population has become an increasing concern as families are leaving the TANF caseload without employment. Authors provide an overview the research on this population, including demographics, barriers to work, and economic hardships they face.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/other_resrch/tanf_ccdf/reports/disconnected.pdf


TANF Recipients with Barriers to Employment, August 2011

This issue brief was authored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation and the Urban Institute. Authors provide an overview of how prevalent barriers to work are in the TANF population. Most TANF recipients have at least one barrier to work and many have multiple barriers, and the likelihood of securing work decreases with the number of barriers that an individual faces. Strategies to help mitigate these barriers include employment-focused and treatment-focused strategies, but even still a large proportion of this population remains out of work.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/barries_employ.pdf


Dynamics of Being Disconnected from Work and TANF, May 2011

This paper, published in May 2011, analyzes the economic well-being of low-income single mothers who are "disconnected" – that is neither working nor receiving public assistance benefits (TANF or disability benefits). Longitudinal data was utilized, allowing for observation of families' changing circumstances over time. Questions regarding the size of the disconnected population, characteristics of disconnected single mothers, their economic state, and how long they remain disconnected are addressed in this paper. Results from this analysis showed that the percentage of disconnected single mothers increased over time. Commonalities between these mothers are that they were extremely poor and are more likely to have challenges that make work more difficult than other single mothers. In addition, many mothers remain in the disconnected state for a year or more.

For more information, please see: http://www.urban.org/uploadedpdf/412393-Dynamics-of-Being-Disconnected-from-Work-and-TANF.pdf


Dynamics of Being Disconnected from Work and TANF, May 2011

Recent data reveals that since the inception of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF) in 1996, many single mothers left the welfare caseload, but are not connected to the labor market. Families who are not connected to the welfare system or the labor market have been referred to as “disconnected”. This report was authored by the Urban Institute with funding from the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) to help understand the size and characteristics of the disconnected population. Findings reveal that over the last 15 years the disconnected population has continued to increase and mothers who are disconnected are more likely to have barriers to employment than other low-income single mothers.

For more information, please see: http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412393-Dynamics-of-Being-Disconnected-from-Work-and-TANF.pdf


U.S. Refugee Resettlement Assistance, 2011

This document, from the Congressional Research Service, provides an overview of the Federal program available to assist refugees when they enter the United States. It also highlights some of the challenges unique to refugees and the impact that existing policies and program have on refugees. This document would be helpful to TANF stakeholders interested in learning more about refugee resettlement resources and potentially partnering with refugee serving organizations and government agencies.

For more information, please see: http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/row/R41570.pdf


Helping Homeless Individuals with Co-Occurring Disorders: The Four Components, 2010

This article from the journal Social Work highlights four practical steps for practitioners when working with homeless individuals struggling with mental illness and substance abuse issues. This population is particularly vulnerable and often hard to serve. Of interest to TANF professionals is a section related to connecting these individuals with employment. The author cites a number of research studies which shed light on best practices for connecting homeless individuals with co-occurring disorders with employment and other services.

For more information, please see: http://sw.oxfordjournals.org/content/57/1/23.full.pdf+html


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2-Parent Families

Building Strong Families Final Evaluation Report, November 2012

Mathematica's family support experts recently completed the Building Strong Families (BSF) evaluation. Sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the project used a random assignment research design to test eight voluntary programs that offer relationship skills education and other support services to unwed couples who are expecting or have just had a baby. After three years, the study showed that BSF had no effect on the quality of couples' relationships and did not make them more likely to stay together or get married.

For more information, please see: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com/publications/PDFs/family_support/BSF_36month_impact_fnlrpt.pdf


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Child Only

The Negative Effects of Instability on Child Development: A Research Synthesis, September 2013

The Urban Institute released a paper discussing the negative effects of instability on child development. This paper reviewed and synthesized research on five areas of instability: family income, parental employment, family structure, housing, and the out-of-home contexts of school and child care. It also discusses some of the key pathways through which instability may affect development and provides recommendations for policy and practice to alleviate instability's impact. In addition to the report, the Urban Institute released a fact sheet that highlights the key findings from the report.

To view this report, please see:: http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412899-The-Negative-Effects-of-Instability-on-Child-Development.pdf

To view this Fact Sheet, please see:: http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412908-The-Negative-Effects-of-Instability-on-Child-Development.pdf


Child Support Program Engages Veteran and Military Families, May 2013

About 6 percent of the national child support caseload involves a veteran or an active military member.

For more information, please see: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/blog/2013/05/child-support-program-engages-veteran-and-military-families


Keeping Children Safe and Helping Families Find Quality Child Care, May 2013

The Department of Health and Human Services proposes new child care regulations that will better ensure children's health and safety in child care and promote school readiness.

For more information, please see: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/blog/2013/05/keeping-children-safe-and-helping-families-find-quality-child-care


Change Management in the Child Support Program, February 2013

Child support has steadily evolved over the decades from a welfare cost-recovery model to a major family support program in a technologically savvy environment.

For more information, please see: http://tinyurl.com/ChildSupportProgram


Early Childhood and Family Homelessness Resource List, January 2013

The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) has released an early childhood and family homelessness resource list in order to reinforce the importance of access to quality early childhood services for young homeless children and their families. The resources listed clarify policy options for State Administrators of Child Care and Head Start Directors to ensure that more young children and their families are served in child care and Head Start programs.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/occ/acf_homeless_resource_list.pdf


TANF and Child Welfare Collaboration Discretionary Grant Cluster, 2013

Child Welfare Information Gateway has developed a web section that lists the grantees from the TANF and Child Welfare Collaboration discretionary grant program which ran from 2006 to 2011. The purpose of the grant program was to demonstrate models of effective collaboration between TANF and child welfare agencies to improve outcomes for at risk children and youth. The web page contains a summary of each program, their project descriptions, site visit highlights, lessons learned, and outcomes found, as well as contact information for each program.

For more information, please see: https://www.childwelfare.gov/management/funding/funding_sources/tanfcw.cfm


Child Well-Being Up in Spite of Greater Poverty, Index Shows, December 2012

America's children and their families are showing greater resilience and support in the face of rising poverty that has now wiped out the historic financial gains of the 1990s, according to the Foundation for Child Development's annual child well-being index. The New York City-based group announced that overall child well-being is up more than five percent both from 2001 and the index's beginning a generation ago, in 1975. The index is a composite of 28 indicators of both children's environmental and economic environments and their own behaviors.

For more information, please see: http://fcd-us.org/sites/default/files/FINAL%202012%20CWI%20Report.pdf


Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) Child-Only Cases: Who Are They? What Policies Affect Them? What is Being Done?, December 2012

Child-only cases have become a substantial presence in the United States' TANF caseload, representing a large portion of TANF cases. Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago released a report with the purpose of aiding policy makers as they contemplate modifications to TANF. This report has three goals: to describe child-only policies and explore how these policies create and shape child-only cases; to provide information about the needs of children and adults in households that receive child-only aid; and to situate child-only TANF policy in the context of other relevant policies.

For more information, please see: http://www.chapinhall.org/sites/default/files/TANF_ChildOnly_0.pdf


Online Resources for State Child Welfare Law and Policy, August 2012

Child Welfare Information Gateway published "Online Resources for State Child Welfare Law and Policy" to provide web addresses for State statutes that are accessible online. These addresses list part of the code for each State and territory that contains the laws addressing child protection, adoption, child welfare, legal guardianship, and services for youth. It also provides web addresses for States' regulation and policy sites, State court rules, Tribal codes, and judicial resources. Information for each State and territory can be accessed on the State Statutes Search page.

For more information, please see: https://www.childwelfare.gov/systemwide/laws_policies/statutes/resources.pdf


NSCAW Research Brief: Instability and Early Life Changes among Children in the Child Welfare System, July 2012

OPRE released a research brief from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW) entitled "Instability and Early Life Changes among Children in the Child Welfare System." This is one in a series of briefs based on data from NSCAW, a nationally representative, longitudinal survey focusing on children who come to the attention of the child welfare system through investigation by child protective services. The survey is being conducted through a contract to RTI. The brief describes the placement histories and changes in living situations of infants who come to the attention of Child Protective Services.

To view this brief, Click Here: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/resource/national-survey-of-child-and-adolescent-well-being-no-18-instability-and


TANF Child-Only Cases, January 2012

From the Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, this research brief focuses on TANF child-only cases. Around half of the TANF caseload is child-only, meaning that no adult is included in calculating the benefit. For many of these cases, these children reside with relatives (41%) or their parent may be ineligible for TANF (59%). Thus, the intersection between TANF and child welfare is important as this population may overlap with both agencies. This research brief provides an overview of the TANF child-only caseload and offers implications for policy and research.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/other_resrch/tanf_ccdf/reports/child_only.pdf


The Long Reach of Early Childhood Poverty: Pathways and Impacts, December 2011

The Center on the Developing Child from Harvard University released a Question and Answer sheet assessing the "Long Reach of Early Childhood Poverty" report. The report was authored by Greg Duncan and Katherine Magnuson. This piece reviews the evidence linking early childhood poverty to long-lasting consequences and discusses strategies to combat the effects of poverty-induced stress on vulnerable families with young children. The new data shows that when children experience poverty, it affects their later-life outcomes. Children's eventual labor market success appears to be compromised much more by poverty experienced early, rather than later, in childhood.

For more information, please see: http://www.stanford.edu/group/scspi/_media/pdf/pathways/winter_2011/PathwaysWinter11_Duncan.pdf

To view this Q & A, please click here.


Living Arrangements of Children: 2009, June 2011

According to the Census Bureau, 7.8 million children lived with at least one grandparent in 2009, a 64 percent increase since 1991. The data was collected in 2009 as part of the household relationship module of the Survey of Income and Program Participation. The Survey of Income and Program Participation is a longitudinal panel survey of demographic information, income, labor force characteristics, and program participation in the United States with supplemental topics on child well-being, child care and household relationships. Census demographers note that the living arrangements of children in the United States is an important indicator of child well-being.

For more information, please see: http://www.census.gov/prod/2011pubs/p70-126.pdf


Kinship Care and Child-Only Cases, 2011

This presentation from Kathy Deserly of the National Resource Center for Tribes was given at the Region X Tribal TANF Conference in September of 2011. The presentation focuses on the different types of kinship care, how it is used in the child welfare and TANF systems, and advantages and challenges of kinship care. Ms. Deserly highlights characteristics of child-only cases within the TANF caseload and makes suggestions for addressing the specific and unique needs of this population.

For more information, please see: https://peerta.acf.hhs.gov/uploadedFiles/Kathy%20Deserly.pdf


TANF Child-Only Cases, 2011

Authored by the Urban Institute with funding from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, this issue brief provides up-to-date information about child-only cases within the TANF caseload. It highlights the critical intersection of TANF and child welfare policies since one third to one half of children living in child-only households have some interaction with child protective services. Also helpful, a chart of studies conducted by States about child-only cases is included for those wanting further information and reading materials.

For more information, please see: http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412573-TANF-Child-Only-Cases.pdf


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Disabilities and SSI

Understanding Supplemental Security Income (SSI): A Guide for TANF Staff Members, February 2014

The Administration of Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) released a brief that describes the basic SSI disability determination process and compares and contrasts it with several procedures different TANF agencies use to identify recipients who meet TANF work-limitation criteria in States or localities. It goes on to discuss topics including different strategies TANF agencies use to assess which individuals are most likely to qualify for SSI.

For more information, please see: https://www.opressrc.org/content/understanding-supplemental-security-income-ssi-guide-tanf-staff-members


Database of Nearly 3,000 Ready-For-Hire Candidates with Disabilities Awaits Employers, December 2013

The United States Department of Labor's Office of Disability Employment Policy, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Defense's Office of Diversity Management and Equal Opportunity, launched the 2013 Workforce Recruitment Program (WRP) database, a recruitment resource for employers seeking a diverse workforce that includes employees with disabilities. The database contains profiles of postsecondary students and recent graduates with disabilities, including veterans, representing a wide variety of academic backgrounds and degree levels. More than 20 federal government agencies regularly utilize the WRP as a recruiting source, with more than 6,500 students obtaining federal employment since 1995.

To register online and begin your search, please see: https://wrp.gov


Project SEARCH, December 2013

Project SEARCH, run by Cincinnati Children's, provides employability skills training and workplace internships for individuals with significant disabilities, particularly youth transitions from high school to adult life. Project SEARCH now has program sites throughout the United States and the United Kingdom, and works with youth with chronic illnesses, traumatic injuries, rehabilitation issues, and other disabilities, and generates a plan that addresses their vocational, educational, training, and employment goals.

For more information, please see: http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/service/p/project-search/vocational/


The Earnings Consequences of the Americans with Disabilities Act on People with Disabilities, November 2013

Mathematica Policy Research released a report that discusses the Congress' attempt to improve labor market outcomes of individuals with disabilities by passing the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). While studies have shown that immediately following the enactment of the ADA, wages of people with disabilities decreased, the longer term wage consequences of the ADA have yet to be studied. Using data from the March CPS, this paper shows that the ADA led to a longer term increase in the weekly wages of individuals with disabilities, and the wage effect of the ADA varies according to level of education.

For more information, please see: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com/publications/pdfs/disability/earning_consequences_WP.pdf


Strength in Our Differences – Annual Progress Report, October 2013

The National Council on Disability (NCD) released their Annual Survey of Federal Disability Policy – "Strength in Our Differences." The NCD is an independent Federal agency that recommends disability policy to the President, Congress, and other Federal agencies. It released its yearly report on the nation's progress in achieving equality of opportunity, independent living, full participation, and economic self-sufficiency for an estimated 57 million Americans with disabilities.

For more information, please see: http://www.ncd.gov/rawmedia_repository/89dce323_2132_4e1d_94d9_d7e4c2d00884


The New Safety Net? Supplemental Security Income after Welfare Reform, September 2013

The Department of Economics from Williams College released a paper in their working papers series discussing the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program, a federally-funded income support program for disabled individuals. The paper uses State panel data to examine the relationships between welfare reform and SSI disabled caseloads for both adults and children. The paper also examines whether the relationship between SSI participation and other factors has been altered after welfare reform. Results are provided that suggest that welfare reform significantly increases SSI participation.

For more information, please see: http://web.williams.edu/Economics/wp/schmidt_ssi_sept_2013_final.pdf


Real World Scenario Provides Valuable Training to Disability Staff, August 2013

The Employment Training Administration's Disability Employment Initiative developed hypothetical case scenarios and video vignettes that help Disability Resource Coordinators and other project staff connect strategies for serving persons with disabilities to overarching customer service strategies. The vignettes touch upon real-life situations that staff faces with their customers such as: How can enrollment in Workforce Investment Act services assist in providing the full range of services to their customers?

For more information, please see: https://disability.workforce3one.org/page/tag/1001321461898858783


The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families – Supplemental Security Income (TANF-SSI) Disability Transition Project, August 2013

A recent Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation report examines two income support programs that are important for many low-income people with disabilities.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/blog/2013/08/the-tanf-ssi-disability-transition-project


Persons With a Disability: Labor Force Characteristics – 2012 News Release, June 2013

The United States Department of Labor has released data on the characteristics of persons with a disability The data on persons with a disability are collected as part of the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly sample survey of about 60,000 households that provides information on employment and unemployment in the United States. Highlights from the data are listed in the report, as well as demographic, employment, unemployment, and labor force characteristics.

For more information, please see: http://www.bls.gov/news.release/archives/disabl_06122013.htm


The Intersection of Welfare and Disability, May 2013

This report from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, written by MDRC, provides early findings from the on-going TANF/SSI Disability Transition Project, which is sponsored by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. This particular report examines how TANF agencies serve those with disabilities and how these agencies work with Social Security Administration offices. Data is also included about the overlap between the two populations and the process and timeline for TANF participants receiving a disability determination after applying for benefits.

Click here for more information.


Ticket to Work Participants: Then and Now, May 2013

Mathematica issued an information brief entitled, "Ticket to Work Participants: Then and Now." Created by Congress to help beneficiaries with disabilities find employment, the Ticket to Work (TTW) program was revised in 2008 to make it more attractive to employment service providers. This brief discusses how the TTW participant population has changed under the revised regulations, and examines how the regulations may have affected beneficiaries' service use, employment outcomes, and satisfaction with TTW.

For more information, please see: https://disability.workforce3one.org/view/2001313650766211919


Grants Available to Improve Disability Employment, April 2013

The United States Department of Labor announced on April 22, 2013 the availability of nearly $18 million in grants to improve educational, training and employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. The grants represent the fourth round of funding through the Disability Employment Initiative, which is jointly funded and administered by two Labor Department agencies, the Employment and Training Administration and the Office of Disability Employment Policy. To date, the department has awarded grants totaling more than $63 million in 23 States.

To apply, please see: http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do?mode=VIEW&oppId=231216


Improving Employment Outcomes and Community Integration for Veterans with Disabilities, April 2013

MDRC released a policy brief describing an innovative program designed to target the psychological and social behaviors that contribute to pain, disability, and inactivity among veterans with disabilities. The goal is to help these veterans resume daily activities and get on a path to work.

To view this policy brief, please see: http://www.mdrc.org/sites/default/files/improving_employment_pgap.pdf


Lessons for Programs Serving Transition-Age Youth: A Comparative Analysis, April 2013

The Center for Studying Disability Policy and Mathematica Policy Research released a report summarizing policies and programs that the United States and 10 other Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) countries are using to provide income support and vocational rehabilitation to transition-age youth with disabilities. The report examines common barriers that inhibit a large portion of young Americans with disabilities from transitioning into adulthood with gainful and stable employment. The four major themes that emerged from the report are: 1) a range of efforts have been made to promote employment, 2) investment in large-scale pilot projects have been helpful to governments to identify what works, 3) most countries are operating programs at various government levels designed to improve access to adult services for people with disabilities, and 4) all countries have actively pursued solutions to the problem of inadequate coordination of youth and adult services.

For more information, please see: http://mathematica-mpr.com/publications/PDFs/disability/Youth_Transition_WP.pdf?spMailingID=6150368&spUserID=NDI3MDM5NDA5NzkS1&spJobID=73615626&spReportId=NzM2MTU2MjYS1


The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the U.S. Health and Human Services Partner to Service Low-Income People with Disabilities, February 2013

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recently announced approximately $98 million in funding for 13 State housing agencies for rental assistance to extremely low-income persons with disabilities, many of whom are transitioning out of institutional settings or are at high risk of homelessness. The aim of the partnership and funding support is to prevent thousands of people with disabilities from experiencing homelessness or unnecessary institutionalization.

For more information, please see: http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2013pres/02/20130212b.html


Youth Transition Demonstration: Lifting Employment Barriers for Youth with Disabilities, February 2013

The Center for Studying Disability Policy released an issue brief discussing the Youth Transition Demonstration (YTD). This study analyzes the interim findings of the YTD project evaluation, and the impact the project evaluation had on paid employment and earnings of youth with disabilities. The study identifies key components of the YTD project and further provides insight into the project for young people with disabilities.

For more information, please see: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com/publications/PDFs/disability/YTD_Brief13-01.pdf


Linking Youth Transition Support Services: Results from Two Demonstration Projects, January 2013

The U.S. Social Security Administration, Office of Retirement and Disability Policy, released an article presenting an overview of two projects in the Social Security Administration's Youth Transition Demonstrations: California's Bridges to Youth Self-Sufficiency and Mississippi's Model Youth Transition Innovation. These programs provided transitional assistance for youth with disabilities who are entitled to Social Security benefits. Key outcomes are reported in the article, along with highlights from two youth who successfully completed the programs.

For more information, please see: http://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/ssb/v73n1/v73n1p59.pdf


Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) Launches Media Campaign Encouraging Youth with Disabilities to Pursue Career Goals, January 2013

The U.S. Department of Labor's Campaign for Disability Employment released a new video public service announcement (PSA) titled "Because." This PSA features real people with disabilities who are pursuing their goals and passions, and intends to replace myths and misperceptions about disability employment with new views of what people with disabilities can do. This campaign aims to serve as an outreach effort to promote the hiring, retention and the advancement of people with disabilities.

For more information, please see: http://www.dol.gov/odep/topics/CampaignForDisabilityEmployment.htm


Disability Employment Publications, 2013

Offered by the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), this Web site lists a wide variety of guides and toolkits for professionals interested in connecting individuals with disabilities with employment. Each publication can be viewed online, or a free copy may be ordered through the mail. Publications include posters, brochures for individuals with disabilities, and tips sheets for professionals.

For more information, please see: http://promotions.usa.gov/odep.html


Fast Facts & Figures About Social Security, 2013

The Social Security Administration (SSA) released a publication titled, "Fast Facts & Figures About Social Security, 2013." This publication answers the most frequently asked questions about SSA administered programs. It highlights basic program data for the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income Programs. Tables and charts are included to illustrate the range of program beneficiaries.

For more information, please see: http://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/chartbooks/fast_facts/2013/fast_facts13.pdf


National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth, 2013

This link provides a quick reference to all legislation related to workforce and disability initiatives. This is a reference for TANF stakeholders who may need a refresher as to what specific legislation provides funding and services for those with disabilities. Summaries of each law are provided as well as links to the actual legislation.

For more information, please see: http://www.ncwd-youth.info/legislation/all#acw


Supplemental Security Income, Welfare Reform, and the Recession, 2013

This short paper examines the effects the Great Recession had on both TANF and SSI take up rates. It also examines the effect that welfare reform had on SSI rates and concludes that since welfare reform in 1996, SSI has been playing a larger part in the general safety net for low-income individuals and families.

For more information, please see: http://www.bostonfed.org/commdev/c&b/2013/spring/supplemental-security-income-welfare-reform-and-the-recession.pdf


The Office of Disability Employment Policy Announces the Release of "Soft Skills to Pay the Bills" Video Series, 2013

The U.S. Department of Labor's Office of Disability Employment Policy released the "Soft Skills to Pay the Bills" Video Series and discussion guide on DVD. The activities in this publication were created to provide an introduction to the "basics" of soft skills. These materials have been designed with youth service professionals in mind – specifically those working with in-school and out-of-school youth, ages 14 to 21, on career and workforce readiness skills. The basic foundation for the structure of these activities includes convenience, cost-effectiveness, and creativity.

For more information, please see: http://promotions.usa.gov/odep.html#youth


Employment Networks Help Serve People with Disabilities, December 2012

The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) issued Training and Employment Notice (TEN) No. 14-12, "Receiving Ticket to Work Payments as an Employment Network." The purpose of this TEN is to announce a streamlined process for the American Job Centers, State workforce agencies, and workforce investment boards to become Employment Networks (ENs) under the Social Security Administration's (SSA) Ticket to Work (TTW) Program. The following are a few highlights from the EN Payment Agreement: 1) It simplifies and reduces paperwork for public workforce entities to become EN's; 2) It permits the use of an Individual Employment Plan to receive payment as EN's; 3) It provides two options for payments; and 4) It permits the use of electronic tools.

For more information, please see: http://wdr.doleta.gov/directives/attach/TEN/TEN_14_12_Acc.pdf


Supplemental Security Income and Children with Disabilities: Just the Facts, December 2012

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits for low-income disabled children are back in the news. Unfortunately, the program is being subject to some sharp criticism that is based on misunderstanding of key issues related to SSI for poor children with disabilities. Discussion and debates concerning this program should be rooted in facts and data, therefore, the Center on Budget Policy and Priorities presents in this report basic facts about the program and try to clear up some significant misunderstandings.

For more information, please see: http://www.cbpp.org/files/12-14-12ss.pdf


A Better Bottom Line, Employing People with Disabilities, November 2012

The A Better Bottom Line: Employing People with Disabilities initiative was developed to provide individuals with disabilities the opportunities to: live close to family and friends; live independently and in safe communities; engage in productive employment; and participate in community life. Specifically, this initiative will focus on the employment challenges that affect individuals with intellectual and other significant disabilities and the role that both State government and business can play in facilitating and advancing opportunities for these individuals to be gainfully employed in the competitive labor market. The initiative will advance employment opportunities for individuals with significant disabilities by: Educating both private sector and public sector employers about accommodating people with disabilities in the workplace and the benefits of doing so; Supporting State governments in joining with business partners to develop blueprints to promote the hiring and retention of individuals with disabilities in integrated employment in both private and public sectors; and Establishing private-public partnerships to build out those blueprints and increase employment of individuals with disabilities.

For more information, please see: http://www.nga.org/files/live/sites/NGA/files/pdf/CI1213BETTERBOTTOMLINE.PDF


Disability.gov Launches 'What's Your Connection?' Campaign to Emphasize Disability as a Universal Link, Encourage Inclusion in all Aspects of Life, November 2012

The Disability.gov website launched "What's Your Connection?" to commemorate the site's 10th anniversary. The initiative emphasizes that disability is a natural part of the human experience and focuses on the integral role people with disabilities play in American society. Disability.gov is managed by the U.S. Department of Labor's Office of Disability Employment Policy in collaboration with 21 federal agency partners.

For more information, please see: https://www.disability.gov/home/newsroom/what%27s_your_connection


ExploreVR, November 2012

ExploreVR (vocational rehabilitation) is a web application that provides State vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies easy and convenient access to a range of VR and related data for planning, evaluation, and decision-making. Overall, this data-sharing effort seeks to increase knowledge about the public VR program and its role within the larger employment and disability service system within and across States and territories.

To view this application, please see: http://explorevr.org/


National Disability Employment Awareness Month, October 2012

October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month, which is a national campaign that raises awareness about disability employment issues and celebrates America's workers with disabilities. This year's theme is "A Strong Workforce is an Inclusive Workforce: What Can YOU Do?" The campaign is led by the U.S. Department of Labor's Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP). ODEP includes a variety of resources designed to raise awareness, including ideas for employers, educators, associations, disability-related organizations and federal agencies.

For more information, please see: http://www.dol.gov/odep/topics/ndeam/


Video Vignettes Illustrate 'Soft Skills' all Young Workers Need - DOL's Office of Disability Employment Policy, October 2012

The U.S. Department of Labor's Office of Disability Employment Policy developed a series of free video vignettes as part of its "Skills to Pay the Bills: Mastering Soft Skills for Workplace Success" curriculum. Youth services programs, educators and others helping young job seekers prepare for employment are encouraged to view, display, share and lead discussions about the videos, which aim to help all youth, including those with disabilities, develop and strengthen six essential skills needed to succeed in today's workforce: communication, networking, enthusiasm and attitude, teamwork, problem-solving and critical thinking, and professionalism.

For more information, please see: http://www.dol.gov/odep/topics/youth/softskills


$20.7 Million for States Through the Disability Employment Initiative, September 2012

On September 20, 2012 the Department of Labor awarded $20.7 million to seven States to assist in the improvement of education, training, employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. The awards were made through the Disability Employment Initiative, which is jointly funded and administered by the Employment and Training Administration and the Office of Disability Employment Policy. The funding is the third round under the initiative, which supports sixteen State projects. The new grants are being awarded to Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota and Rhode Island.

For more information, please see: http://www.dol.gov/opa/media/press/odep/ODEP20121933.htm


Employment for People with Disabilities, September 2012

The American Public Human Services Association (APHSA), through its "Pathways Initiative," is forging a vision for a transformed human service system. This policy brief is one of a series from APHSA addressing specific policies and recommendations that support the four outcome impact areas identified under their Pathways Initiative: participating in community life, earning income, reducing dependence on public benefits, and contributing to communities by becoming workers and taxpayers. This brief supports the outcome of Gainful Employment and Independence, for persons with disabilities.

To view this policy brief, please see: http://www.aphsa.org/policy/Doc/Disabilities-Policy-Brief.pdf


U.S. Department of Education Awards More Than $9.8 Million to Fund Centers for Parents of Students with Disabilities, September 2012

The U.S. Department of Education announced the award of more than $9.8 million in grants to 16 States to operate 25 Parent Training and Information (PTI) Centers for parents of students with disabilities. The grants will provide funds to education centers to help parents access the free public education system for their children as well as connecting parents with information on early intervention for children with disabilities.

For more information, please see: http://www.ed.gov/news/press-releases/us-department-education-awards-more-98-million-fund-centers-parents-students-dis


Strategies to Support Employer-Driven Initiatives to Recruit and Retain Employees with Disabilities, July 2012

From the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development and the Kessler Foundation, this research brief outlines innovative practices by employers who operate warehouse distribution centers. Such strategies can be applied to increasing the quality of employment for people with disabilities. Authors highlight a paradigm shift in this area, which focuses on the importance of employer partnerships to meet the needs of both employers and potential employees with disabilities. Companies, such as Walgreens, Lowe's, Toys R Us, and Proctor and Gamble, have been successful in creating local partnerships to recruit people with disabilities.

For more information, please see: http://kesslerfoundation.org/news/HeldrichReport_July2012_EmployerInitiatives_PeoplewithDisabilities.pdf


Back to Work: Recent SSA Employment Demonstrations for People with Disabilities, June 2012

This report summarizes the short term effects of four current demonstration projects from the Social Security Administration (SSA) on the self-sufficiency of recipients of SSI and SSDI. The random assignment evaluations of these projects will measure long term effects of the demonstration projects when completed. The short term impacts show a slight increase in employment for this population and highlight some of the common challenges these individuals face.

For more information, please see: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com/publications/pdfs/disability/backtowork_ib.pdf


Employing People With Disabilities: Practices and Policies Related to Accessibility and Accommodation, May 2012

Cornell University's School of Employment and Disability Institute collaborated to conduct a survey on the practices and policies related to accessibility and accommodation for people with disabilities. On May 17, 2012, these findings were published and are currently the second in a three part series on organizational practices and policies related to the employment of people with disabilities. Results show that three out of four (75%) organizations designate an office or person to address accommodation questions, and more than one-half of organizations (56%) indicate that having a centralized accommodation fund (i.e., companywide fund to provide accommodations for people with disabilities) was a very effective practice.

Click here for more information.


The Future of Children: Children with Disabilities, April 2012

The Future of Children released a new volume, which is focused on children with disabilities. Authors explore not just one type of disability, but cross-cutting themes of children with disabilities on a broad level. The researchers contributing to this volume analyze childhood disabilities and the prevalence, nature, treatment, costs, and consequences. Researchers also provide information on how this issue relates to the nation's education, health insurance, and medical systems.

For more information, please see: http://futureofchildren.org/futureofchildren/publications/journals/journal_details/index.xml?journalid=77


The Impact of Temporary Assistance Programs on Disability Rolls and Re-Employment, January 2012

The Urban Institute authored this report, which includes research on the relationship between temporary and disability benefits. Using the Survey of Income and Program Participation, authors look at Disability Insurance (DI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) applicants and application for four temporary assistance programs: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Unemployment Insurance (UI), and Temporary Disability Insurance programs (TDI). Results show that applications for disability programs are related to participation in temporary programs.

For more information, please see: http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412503-The-Impact-of-Temporary-Assistance-Programs-on-Disability-Rolls-and-Re-Employment.pdf


Integrated Employment, EmploymentFirst, and U.S. Federal Policy, 2012

This article provides a historical look at federal policy as it relates to the employment of people with disabilities over the last 40 years. Of particular interest to TANF stakeholders is the descriptions of integrated employment and EmploymentFirst, two strategies that the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) has promoted to assist individuals with serious disabilities connect with work.

For more information, please see: http://www.dol.gov/odep/pdf/20130501-martinez.pdf


Reentry Programs for Students with Disabilities in the Juvenile Justice System: Four State Approaches, December 2011

This article briefly reviews research on transition challenges for youth with disabilities in the juvenile justice system and supports needed to become self-sufficient. Profiles of four State programs are provided, including program models, results, funding, and evaluation efforts. From the four example States, common themes are identified for future work.

For more information, please see: http://nasdse.org/DesktopModules/DNNspot-Store/ProductFiles/66_0082f096-5a9d-49f7-a2c1-c6ff737af209.pdf


Computer/Electronic Accommodations Program: Online Training Modules, August 2011

The Federal Government’s CAP (Computer/Electronic Accommodations Program) has released the first series of online training modules. This first module is titled, “Increasing Federal Employment of People with Disabilities,” and discusses Executive Orders 13518 and 13548, which are focused on the federal hiring requirements of Veterans and individuals with disabilities.

For more information, please see: http://cap.mil/NewsEvents/Training.aspx#


Partners in Employment, August 2011

Disability.gov offers a free self-study course to help people with developmental disabilities build practical skills to find jobs. The course offers information on understanding the hiring process, supported and competitive employment, and how to identify worker strengths and skills to translate into a career.

For more information, please see: http://www.partnersinpolicymaking.com/employment-ez/


Moving TANF Recipients with Disabilities to Work: Examples of State Strategies, June 2011

As part of the National Technical Assistance and Research Center to Promote Leadership for Increasing the Employment and Economic Independence of Adults with Disabilities (NTAR Leadership Center) at the Office of Disability Employment Policy, U.S. Department of Labor, this issue brief provides an overview of activities in place to help move TANF participants with a disability into employment. Authors examine opportunities and challenges within states to build support services for this population, and provide information on strategies already in place that state TANF agencies are using to help participants with disabilities gain employment.

For more information, please see: http://www.dol.gov/odep/pdf/ntar-issue-brief7-tanf.pdf


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Domestic Violence

Domestic Violence 101 e-Learning Course, March 2013

The Administration for Children and Families Family Violence Prevention and Services Program is pleased to announce the launch of Domestic Violence: Understanding the Basics, an online learning tool. This one-hour interactive eLearning module describes the dynamics and common tactics that characterize domestic violence, provides an overview of the scope and impact on individuals and society, explores the underlying factors that allow domestic violence to exist, offers insight into the various risks and choices that survivors face, and shares how to be part of the solution.

To view this online tool, please see: http://www.vawnet.org/elearning/DVBasics/player.html


Domestic Violence Resources – National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse, October 2012

One in five women experience domestic violence at some time in their lives, and over 15 million children witness domestic violence each year. Given these statistics, fatherhood programs may be serving families where violence has been an issue. It is imperative that fatherhood programs establish protocols to address domestic violence and protect the safety of all family members including children. Health and Human Services' funded State domestic violence coalitions are an important resource in building partnerships with domestic violence providers and developing protocols. The NRFC has resources, training webinars, and more tools to help fatherhood programs address and combat the issue of domestic violence.

For more information, please see: http://www.fatherhood.gov/for-programs/for-your-fathers/domestic-violence


Helping Domestic Violence Survivors Build Assets, October 2012

The Assets for Independence (AFI) Resource Center had developed a collection of resources relating to assisting domestic violence survivors build assets, use Individual Development Accounts, and gain financial independence. Resources are provided to help AFI programs better understand domestic violence, ways to partner with domestic violence programs and information to share with domestic violence service providers about ways AFI can help survivors. A section also exists, especially for domestic violence service providers, that explains what AFI is and how the program can help. These resources would be helpful for TANF agencies and AFI programs to share with domestic violence service providers in their area to help build collaboration.

For more information, please see: http://www.idaresources.org/page?pageid=a047000000Bmr7F


Technology and Confidentiality Resources Toolkit, October 2012

The National Network to End Domestic Violence recently launched a new toolkit which provides comprehensive information about ensuring confidentiality and safety for victims of domestic and sexual violence. Included in the toolkit are templates, tip sheets, charts, sample policies and procedures and frequently asked questions relating to ensuring confidentiality. The toolkit can be a valuable resource for TANF programs who are seeking to enhance their services to domestic violence survivors. Additionally, the toolkit includes specific resources for programs that are co-located with domestic violence providers, a practice that has become increasingly more common among TANF agencies.

For more information, please see: http://www.nnedv.org/tools


The Role of Economic Factors and Economic Support in Preventing and Escaping from Intimate Partner Violence, October 2012

This article provides a thorough overview of the existing research related to how poor economic situations contribute to intimate partner violence. The authors explain how low socio-economic status, unemployment, career stress, and poverty are associated with rates and severity of violence. Research is also provided that shows what mitigates these factors. This document would be helpful to TANF stakeholders interested in learning how participation in TANF can help survivors of violence and why poverty can exacerbate violence.

For more information, please see: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pam.21666/pdf


Assets for Independence (AFI) Serving Domestic Violence Survivors Toolkit, April 2012

The Federal government has recently placed a greater emphasis on connecting survivors with asset building programs as a way to build financial independence for the population. With this goal in mind, this toolkit was designed as a step by step guide for both AFI programs and domestic violence service providers interested in creating partnerships. It provides information targeted specifically at each partners, as well as additional resources such as draft MOUs and letters of commitments.

For more information, please see: http://idaresources.acf.hhs.gov/servlet/servlet.FileDownload?file=01570000001bh8JAAQ


Helping Children and Teens Cope with the Effects of Domestic Violence: Fostering Healing and Resilience, March 2012

On Thursday, May 3, 2012 from 1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m. EST, the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health will host its third webinar of its 2012 Trauma Informed Webinar Series. This webinar will focus on strategies for working with children and teens who are affected by domestic violence. The webinar will cover the following topics:

  • Affects of domestic violence on a child’s development;
  • Methods for strengthening children’s and teens’ adaptive coping and resilience skills; and
  • Overall training methods for working with children and teens affected by domestic violence.

The presenter for this webinar is Susan Blumenfeld, MSW, LCSW. Ms. Blumenfeld is the Child Trauma Director at the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health.

Click here for more information.


National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse Webinar: Taking the Domestic Violence Conversation to the Community, August 2011

This National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse (NRFC) Webinar from August 2011 presented strategies and approaches you can use in your program to raise awareness and change behavior, and had an emphasis on working with men in a fatherhood context and empowering them to take these conversations to family, friends and community. Topics included: ways to raise fatherhood program participants' awareness of the realities of violent and controlling behavior and the negative impacts for children; emphasize communication, mutual understanding, and healing; and, ways to use fatherhood groups to reinforce the message and build mutual support systems to change behavior.

For more information, please see: http://www.fatherhood.gov/for-programs/resources/webinar-archives/webinars-2011


Impact of Intimate Partner Violence on Economic Well-Being, 2011

This research brief from the Center for Financial Security at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provides a thorough overview of the impact of domestic violence on the economic well-being of women. Domestic violence negatively impacts women in a variety of ways, many of which have financial and employment-related implications. For TANF stakeholders wishing to understand how domestic violence directly impacts the employment and financial security of a victim, this brief provides a condensed review of publish research on the topic.

For more information, please see: http://www.cfs.wisc.edu/briefs/Tolman2011_ImpactBrief.pdf


State Employment Protection Statutes for Victims of Domestic Violence as an Employment Matter, 2011

This discussion paper from the University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research provides analysis of state statutes related to employment protection for survivors of domestic violence. Domestic violence is often not viewed as a workplace concern, but as this report highlights, it can be a huge barrier to employment, safety, and ultimately, self-sufficiency. Example policies are provided, as well as implications for employers, human service professionals, and policy makers.

For more information, please see: http://www.ukcpr.org/Publications/DP2010-11.pdf


Savings Outcomes of an IDA Program for Survivors of Domestic Violence, 2010

This study examined the outcomes of an IDA program for survivors of domestic violence based in St. Louis, Missouri. The majority of the women involved in the program were able to save money and made matched withdrawals from their account. This demonstrated that IDA programs can be used successfully with survivors of domestic violence.

For more information, please see: http://csd.wustl.edu/Publications/Documents/RP10-42.pdf


Economic Stress and Domestic Violence, September 2009

In light of the recent recession, this paper examines the effect that financial strain can have on the occurrence of domestic violence and in turn, how domestic violence impacts an individual or family's financial situation. Though being low income does not correlate directly to victimization, research shows a strong relationship between economic hardship and the risk for domestic violence. Financial status can also be affected by the type of abuse a victim suffers; economic abuse being a common tool employed by batterers. The article also addresses how social services, particularly TANF can play a part in helping survivors move towards safety and self-sufficiency. The report concludes by highlighting research which shows that victims feel that housing and financial assistance are the most helpful, over and above counseling and other non-tangible forms of help.

For more information, please see: http://www.vawnet.org/Assoc_Files_VAWnet/AR_EconomicStress.pdf


Training Forums from the Office on Violence Against Women, January 2009

This is a Web-based training and education program that was developed by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women and Witness Justice, to address issues facing professionals that work with survivors of domestic violence. The online curriculum includes training on working with undocumented survivors, promoting cultural competency, and providing Trauma and Trauma-Informed Care. Since TANF professionals are often faced with participants that may have experienced domestic violence, these training courses can support effective service delivery.

For more information, please see: http://trainingforums.org/


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Foster Care/Independent Living

Identifying and Serving LGBTQ Youth: Case Studies of Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grantees, February 2014

The Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services released a report that presents findings on four topics: (1) agencies' collection and use of data on clients' sexual orientation and gender identity, (2) providers' assessment and perceptions of needs and capacities among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) Runaway and Homeless Youth (RHY), (3) providers' approaches to serving LGBTQ RHY, and (4) providers' perceptions of research gaps and data needs related to services for LGBTQ RHY. The purpose of the study was to learn about programs' strategies for identifying and serving LGBTQ RHY, the challenges programs face in understanding and addressing the needs of this population, and potential areas for future research.

For more information, please see: http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/14/lgbt-rhy/rpt_lgbtq%20rhy.cfm


Fostering Careers, September 2011

At the end of 2010, the unemployment rate for teens ages 16 to 19 in New York City was 40 percent, and youth aging out of the foster care system were fairing even worse in the labor market. From the Center for an Urban Future, this study analyzed the challenges that foster youth face in attaining and maintaining employment once they age out of the foster care system. Authors also looked at protective factors in the foster care and workforce development systems that can help better serve this population, and offer recommendations for program improvement.

For more information, please see: http://www.nycfuture.org/images_pdfs/pdfs/FosteringCareers.pdf


Evaluation of the Independent Living—Employment Services Program, Kern County, California: Final Report, June 2011

This report from the Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation summarizes findings from a process and impact study of a Multi-Site Evaluation of Foster Youth Programs. Specifically focused on the Kern County site, impact findings are based on a two-year follow-up of youth who participated in a random assignment evaluation of the Independent Living—Employment Services Program (IL-ES). Results show few statistically significant findings between the control and the treatment group suggesting that youth should be actively engaged in employment-based activities beyond the IL-ES program.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/abuse_neglect/chafee/reports/eval_kern/eval_kern.pdf


The Youth Demonstration Development Project: Synthesis of Research and Resources to Support At-Risk Youth, June 2011

The Administration for Children and Families offers a variety of programs to help support low-income youth and their families to foster positive youth development and self-sufficiency in adulthood. These programs are designed to prepare at-risk youth for the labor market by promoting job skills. This report, from the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, provides a synthesis of the research on at-risk youth and how they are being served by ACF and non-ACF programs to promote future self-sufficiency. Authors review the research and offer future issues to consider for serving this population.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/fys/youth_development/reports/synthesis_youth.pdf


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Immigrants and Trafficking

Promising Practices for Increasing Immigrants' Access to Health and Human Services, May 2012

The Immigrant Access to Health and Human Services project describes the legal and policy contexts that affect immigrant access to health and human services. This study's goal is to identify and describe Federal, State, and local program eligibility provisions related to immigrants, barriers to immigrants' access to services, and promising practices. Authored by the Urban Institute under contract with the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, this issue brief describes promising practices that States are employing to help target this population, which includes strategies like streamlining eligibility and addressing logistical barriers like transportation.

For more information, please see: http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/11/ImmigrantAccess/Practices/rb.pdf


Bridging Refugee Youth and Children’s Services: Promising Practices, 2012

The Bridging Refugee Youth and Children’s Services (BRYCS) website provides an interactive map of the United States with links to promising practices across the country. For each State, BRYCS provides a list of refugee-serving organizations offering a wide range of services. Programs are included if the program has been recommended as successful by other providers, federal or State partners or experts, are based on principles from research on risk and protective factors for this population, and have results-oriented information on the program’s benefits.

For more information, please see: http://www.brycs.org/promisingPractices/index.cfm


Raising Children in a New Country: Toolkit for Working with Newcomer Parents, 2012

This Toolkit was authored by the Bridging Refugee Youth and Children’s Services (BRYCS), and provides culturally responsive parenting information to help agencies working with refugees. The Toolkit includes information on how organizations can educate refugee parents in maintaining a positive relationship with their children. Authors provide an overview of research on parent education programs for this population and how to help parents access such support services, as well as helping organizations build programs for educating refugee parents.

For more information, please see: http://www.brycs.org/_cs_upload/documents/1859_1.pdf


Office of Refugee Resettlement 2011 National Consultation, September 2011

The Welfare Peer TA Network recently presented at the Office of Refugee Resettlement 2011 National Consultation in Washington, DC. The session entitled, “Collaborative Pathways to Self-Sufficiency for Refugees”, highlighted TANF and ORR Promising Pathways. The consultation brings together a wide variety of stakeholders from ORR, its federal partners, state and local officials, service providers, volunteers, refugees and other program supporters.

View Presentation [PDF - 700 KB]

Final Report from WPTA Event: Improving Engagement in Work Activities and Creating Pathways to Self-Sufficiency for TANF and Immigrant Populations


2010 Yearbook of Immigration Statistics, August 2011

The Office of Immigration Statistics at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security released the 2010 Yearbook of Immigration Statistics. The Yearbook includes a compendium of tables with data on foreign nationals who, during fiscal year 2010, were granted lawful permanent residence (i.e., admitted as immigrants or became legal permanent residents), were admitted into the United States on a temporary basis (e.g., tourists, students, or workers), applied for asylum or refugee status, or were naturalized.

For more information, please see: http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/statistics/yearbook/2010/ois_yb_2010.pdf


The Geography of Immigrant Skills: Educational Profiles of Metropolitan Areas, June 2011

This report is from the Brookings Institution on immigrant skills and the labor market. Immigrants are now about 14 percent of U.S residents and about 16 percent of workers and have a significant presence in industries such as construction and hospitality on the low-skill end, and information technology and health care on the high-skill end. Authors argue that it is important to understand the immigrant workforce in the context of long-term U.S global competitiveness, and provide a profile of immigrant skills in the top 100 metropolitan areas in the U.S.

For more information, please see: http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Files/rc/papers/2011/06_immigrants_singer/06_immigrants_singer.pdf


Poor Children by Parents’ Nativity: What Do We Know?, April 2011

Immigration has played an important role in shaping U.S. society. Currently, 17.2 million children have a parent who is foreign-born, and 4.2 million with immigrant parents that are low-income. This issue brief is from the National Center for Children in Poverty and examines differences between children with native-born parents versus children of immigrant parents across socio-demographic measures such as material hardship and public assistance use. Findings reveal that immigrant families are more likely to be in lower wage jobs and have barriers to accessing work supports.

For more information, please see: http://nccp.org/publications/pdf/text_1006.pdf


Young Children of Immigrants and the Path to Educational Success, April 2011

This report summarizes the Urban Institute Roundtable that occurred in June 2010, called “Young Children of Immigrants and the Path to Educational Success.” Sponsored by the Foundation for Child Development and the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the conference sought to focus attention on the specific needs of young children and their immigrant families to close educational gaps. Key stakeholders included Federal and state policymakers, practitioners, and experts on child development, early education, K–12 education, and immigration researchers.

For more information, please see: http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412330-young-children.pdf


Supporting Refugee Families: Adapting Family Strengthening Programs that Build on Assets, October 2010

From the Bridging Refugee Youth and Children’s Services (BRYCS), this issue brief provides information on how to better serve refugee populations. Family Strengthening Programs can be developed to help programs address the risks that refugees face and help families build on their existing strengths. A key component of adapting the Family Strengthening perspective is involving refugee families in program development as part of an advisory group. This brief concludes with promising practices from two programs that have adapted the program to serve this population.

For more information, please see: http://www.brycs.org/documents/upload/brycs_spotfall2010.pdf


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Non-custodial Parents

Kansas 529 Initiative for Noncustodial Parents, 2013

The Assets for Independence (AFI) Resource Center released an article introducing and explaining the 529 plan. The State of Kansas is promoting savings for postsecondary education by offering this unique 529 plan for noncustodial parents. The 529 plans are investment accounts for postsecondary education expenses that may increase in value over time. Contributions to 529 plans may be deducted from income taxes. In the State of Kansas, under the Child Support Savings Incentive (CSSI) Program, eligible noncustodial parents can now open and contribute to 529 savings accounts for their children and receive a reduction in State child support arrears of double the amount deposited. For every one dollar saved towards their education, they receive a reduction in arrears of two dollars.

For more information, please see: http://www.dcf.ks.gov/services/CSS/Pages/529.aspx


It's Not All about Money: Non-Financial Ways Non-Custodial Parents Can Help Their Families, 2012

This fact sheet from the National Resource Center for Healthy Marriage and Families offers suggestions for ways that safety-net service providers can help non-custodial parents explore non-financial mechanisms for participating in their children's lives. This would be a helpful resource for TANF case managers to share with participants wishing to be more involved in their children's lives.

For more information, please see: http://tinyurl.com/not-all-about-money-p


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Substance Abuse/Mental Health

National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices (NREPP), 2012

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), hosts NREPP. NREPP is a database of mental and substance abuse interventions that are reviewed by independent reviewers. Users can search the database, view a list of all evidence-based intervention programs and practices, as well as contact representatives to learn more about each listed program and practice.

For more information, please see: http://nrepp.samhsa.gov/Search.aspx


Drug Testing Welfare Recipients: Recent Proposals and Continuing Controversies, October 2011

This issue brief was authored by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation within the Office of Human Services Policy at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The issue brief addresses the recent debate to require drug tests as a condition of TANF program eligibility by providing both benefits and limitations of such a policy. It is estimated that between 4 and 37 percent of TANF participants have substance abuse barriers. Authors consider the impact of drug testing on costs, child well-being, and increase employment and also provide a comprehensive appendix of 2010 and 2011 Federal and State legislative proposals for implementing drug testing for TANF eligibility.

For more information, please see: http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/11/DrugTesting/ib.pdf


Adolescent Substance Use in the U.S.: Facts for Policymakers, May 2011

From the National Center for Children in Poverty, this resource provides a comprehensive overview of adolescent substance use, which can hinder adolescent developmental growth into adulthood. Substance use in adolescence can lead to the risk of dependency and addiction, and adverse health outcomes. In 2009, 10 percent of 12 to 17 year olds were illicit drug users, and 26 percent of 16 to 17 year olds reported drinking alcohol. Authors conclude with policy recommendations for prevention and treatment programs for this population.

For more information, please see: http://nccp.org/publications/pdf/text_1008.pdf


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Teen Parents

Reducing Teen Childbearing among Latinos: An Innovative Anti-Poverty Strategy, February 2014

Child Trends recently released a research brief that identifies and outlines promising approaches to reduce early childbearing among Latino adolescents. This work included a review of research studies, a scan of intervention programs, focus groups with adolescents, and interviews with parents, program designers, and program staff, as well as analyses of national databases. The authors synthesize the results across these various research methods to identify major findings and implications for teen pregnancy prevention efforts for Latinos.

For more information, please see: http://www.childtrends.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/2014-04ReducingLatinoTeenChildbearing1.pdf


Education Department Releases Guidance to Help Schools Better Support Pregnant and Parenting Students' Academic Success, June 2013

The Department of Education has issued a Dear Colleague letter and accompanying pamphlet on supporting the academic success of pregnant and parenting students until Title IX. This pamphlet updates and expands upon the pamphlet on this topic issued in 1991. The pamphlet also provides information on school retention problems associated with young mothers and fathers and the requirements related to these issues contained in the Department's regulation implemented in Title IX.

To view the letter, please see: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/letters/colleague-201306-title-ix.pdf

To view the accompanying pamphlet, please see: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/pregnancy.pdf


Expanding the Evidence to Help Teen Moms Make Healthy Choices, May 2013

One of the best ways we can support teen moms is to help them plan their families in a healthy way.

For more information, please see: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/blog/2013/05/expanding-the-evidence-to-help-teen-moms-make-healthy-choices


Collaborative Approaches to Teen Pregnancy Prevention: Public Agencies, Community Partnerships, and Policy Research, 2013

Chapin Hall, at the University of Chicago, hosted this webcast, which provided information to interested stakeholders on pregnancy prevention efforts within the city of Chicago, as well as available Federal funding for efforts throughout the country. Presenters provided information from policy, programmatic, and research perspectives, and a number of practices that are currently working in the field were shared.

For more information, please see: http://www.chapinhall.org/march14forum


Findyouthinfo.gov, 2013

FindYouthInfo.gov was created by the Interagency Working Group on Youth Programs (IWGYP), which is composed of representatives from 12 Federal departments and five Federal agencies that support programs and services focusing on youth. The Web site's purpose is to disseminate promising practices and effective strategies and promote enhanced collaboration for those working with youth and in youth-serving organizations. The Web site features a resource page specifically targeted for teen pregnancy prevention. It allows users to search for information by topic, find local youth programs via a zip code search, search for funding, and explore existing collaborations.



For more information, please see: http://www.findyouthinfo.gov/

To view the Resource Page, please see: http://findyouthinfo.gov/youth-topics/teen-pregnancy-prevention


Podcast: Union City Sustained Youth Development Project Podcast, 2013

In this podcast from the National Clearinghouse on Families and Youth, Karl Kallgren, director of the Union City Sustained Youth Development Project, discusses the youth program that has helped teen pregnancy rates drop by 20 percent in a rural Pennsylvania community.

For more information, please see: http://findyouthinfo.gov/federal-link/interview-director-union-city-sustained-youth-development-project


Replicating Evidence-Based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Programs: A Case Study, 2013

This video was filmed during the Emphasizing Evidence Based Programs for Children and Youth Forum which occurred in April 2012 in Washington D.C. It features a presentation from Amy Margolis, Public Health Advisor with the Office of Adolescent Health (OAH), who highlighted evidence based programs that were found via OAH-funded research. OAH is currently funding grantees to replicate these evidence-based programs across the country.

To view this video, please see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Rt9sM-bskw&list=PLC9DFA0A549C0F23C&index=2


An Overview of Programs Providing Services to Low-Income Teen Parents, October 2012

The Welfare Peer TA Network hosted a Webinar on providing services to low-income teen parents. The Webinar, "An Overview of Programs Providing Services to Low-Income Teen Parents" highlighted the program design and implementation of two programs serving low-income teen parents, provided information to TANF organizations on program models for serving low-income teen parents, discussed key partnerships and strategies for developing partnerships, and shared strategies for overcoming challenges and barriers to service delivery. Presenters include representatives from the D.C. Teen Parent Assessment Project (TPAP) and the Ohio Learning, Earning, and Parenting (LEAP) Program.



Teen Parenting Webinar PowerPoint [PDF - 1,641 KB]

Teen Parenting Webinar Transcript [PDF - 215 KB]

Teen Parenting Webinar Recording (mp3) [MP3 - 9,756 KB]

Teen Parenting Webinar Q&A [PDF - 149 KB]


Online Lessons: Preventing Unplanned Pregnancy and Completing College, August 2012

The American Association of Community Colleges and The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy are hosting a free Webinar on August 15, 2012 at 1:00 p.m. EDT on the National Campaign's online lessons to help students prevent unplanned pregnancy. The lessons provide information on how unplanned pregnancy might affect students' educational goals, relationships, and finances. During the Webinar, speakers will discuss the lessons and how programs can integrate them into their curricula and courses. Speakers include: Melinda Andrews, Faculty, First-Year Experience, Richland College (TX); Bobbi Dubins, Instructor, Developmental Education, Allegany College of Maryland; Virginia Kirk, Former Director, Distance Learning, Howard Community College (MD); and Allison Michael, Instructor, First-Year Experience, Richland College (TX).

Click Here for More Information.


A Ramsey County-TANF Partnership to Improve Teen Family Outcomes, 2012

This article appears in an annual report compiled by the Center for Early Childhood Development at the University of Minnesota on coordinating systems for better child outcomes. It highlights a partnership that Ramsey County, Minnesota developed between their TANF program and their existing public health nurse home visiting program. The subsequent program model streamlines the TANF system for teen parents and provides for in-home and school- based services and supports for teen parents as they plan to attend higher education or enter the workforce after graduation or GED completion. The program boasts increased positive birth outcomes and high school/GED completion rates for teens involved in this program versus their uninvolved counterparts.

For more information, please see: https://www.cehd.umn.edu/CEED/publications/earlyreport/earlyreportfall2012.pdf#page=15


Promising Strategies and Existing Gaps in Supporting Pregnant and Parenting Teens, 2012

This report summarizes two meetings held in 2012 with expert panels that discussed ways to enhance the knowledge of promising practices when working with pregnant and parenting teens. The expert gatherings were hosted by the Office of Adolescent Health, within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In addition to existing promising practices, effective program components and examples of these components are given for those working with pregnant and parenting teens.

For more information, please see: http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah/resources-and-publications/info/Assets/paf_expert_panel_rpt_2012.pdf


Preventing Pregnancy Among Older Teens, 2011

This issue brief, authored by the National Conference of State Legislatures, examines the needs surrounding older teens who experience unintended pregnancies. Community colleges see a high dropout rate for women who attend and then become pregnant, highlighting the fact that unplanned pregnancies often derail educational goals. An overview of Federal funding provided to States to prevent and address unplanned pregnancies is provided.

For more information, please see: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/policymakers/PDF/NCSL_PreventingPregnancy_5.13.11.pdf


Second Chance Homes: A Resource for Teen Mothers, 2011

This issue brief authored by Child Trends, examines Second Chance Homes, a newer program model, similar to maternity group homes. They serve young, unmarried mothers who can no longer live at home with their own parent. These young women are at high risk for becoming homeless, and the Second Chance Homes offer a supportive environment for raising their child(ren) while encouraging (often requiring) mothers to finish high school or obtain a GED, learn life skills, and develop parenting skills. The Administration for Children and Families provides funding for these homes through the TANF block grant, as well as other funding sources. This type of program could be a relevant referral and potential partner for TANF agencies seeking to better serve teen parents.

For more information, please see: http://www.childtrends.org/Files/Child_Trends-2011_04_15_RB_2ndChanceHomes.pdf


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