Challenges to Employment/Special Populations

This section from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families offers key welfare information on addressing challenges to employment and special populations of low-income families.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATIONS

This section provides resources related to those who are hard to employ and/or those experiencing barriers to self-sufficiency.

Don’t see what you are looking for? Browse our report archives for [2015] [2014] [2013]

General Topic

Human Services for Low-Income and At-Risk LGBT Populations: An Assessment of the Knowledge Base and Research Needs, January 2015

This report discusses what is known about the low-income and at-risk lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) population and their interactions with human services, especially services funded by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), and identifies important areas for further research. To provide context for the needs assessment findings, the assessment begins by describing the scope and estimated size of the LGBT population in the United States as well as factors that may contribute to social and economic disadvantages for the LGBT population. The assessment then presents the framework and methods for the needs assessment and ultimately recommends potential areas for future research to enhance the knowledge base surrounding the human service needs of low-income and at-risk LGBT populations.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/lgbt_hsneeds_assessment_reportfinal1_12_15.pdf


Fact Sheet: Estimates of Unemployment Rates, November 2014

Published by the Economic Policy Institute, this fact sheet provides readers with estimate unemployment rates in some of the United States' most populated cities. The report sorts the data by race and ethnicity of individuals living in each of the 12 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) with a Federal Reserve Bank. In addition, it includes illustrative charts and figures for readers to better understand the findings.

For more information, please see: http://www.epi.org/publication/fed-unemployment-race/


Helping the Hard-to-Employ and Their Families, September 2014

Released by The Institute for Research on Poverty, this policy brief focuses on hard-to-employ individuals and the different ways to improve work opportunities, earnings, and incomes for this target population. The brief includes detailed analysis of child poverty trends in the U.S. as well as policy recommendations to assist these populations.

For more information, please see: http://www.irp.wisc.edu/publications/policybriefs/pdfs/PB3-HelpingHardToEmploy.pdf


Models of Collaboration between Workforce Investment and Refugee Resettlement Stakeholders, August 2014

The Office of Refugee Resettlement released a report that highlights three models of collaboration to support refugees that are seeking employment. Each model contains elements that could be replicated in any number of settings throughout the country.

For more information, please see: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/orr/models_of_collaboration_between_workforce_investment_and_refugee.pdf


Head Start CARES for Migrant and Seasonal Families: Adapting a Preschool Social-Emotional Curriculum, July 2014

The Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation released a report that outlines methods for delivering social-emotional programs within Migrant and Seasonal Head Start (MSHS) programs, outcomes, and lessons learned. Insights from this report will inform other developers and practitioners that are interested in creating curriculum and programs to serve this population.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/hs_cares_migrant_report_2014_002.pdf


Understanding Labor Market Information – For Agencies/Programs Serving Refugees, July 2014

The Office of Refugee Resettlement hosted a webinar called "Understanding Labor Market Information – For Agencies/Programs Serving Refugees" on Thursday, July 10, 2014. There is a wealth of publicly available labor market information and data that refugee agencies and programs can strategically use to enhance the employment and career pathway opportunities for refugees. However, many agencies and programs may not be aware of the labor market navigation and information resources available in their states or local areas. This webinar discussed how to navigate these resources, and how agencies and program staff that serve refugees can help their clients better understand the education and employment resources available to them.



Transcript [PDF - 116 KB]

Recording [WMV - 17,576 KB] PPT Presentation [PDF - 3,195 KB]


Webinar: Supporting Workplace Success for Refugees: How Workforce Agencies Can Collaborate with Refugee Programs, June 12, 2014

The Office of Refugee Resettlement hosted the "Supporting Workplace Success for Refugees: How Workforce Agencies Can Collaborate with Refugee Programs" webinar on Thursday, June 12. Every year, the United States welcomes more refugees than any other country in the world. These refugees typically have a strong work ethic and sense of loyalty that employers find valuable. However, connecting refugees and employers often requires multiple service providers to work together. This webinar highlighted opportunities for workforce agencies, refugee programs, and refugees themselves to collaborate on strong employment outcomes.

Webinar Recording [WMV - 14,578 KB]

Transcript [PDF - 117 KB]

PPT Presentation [PDF - 1,011 KB]


Understanding the Dynamics of Disconnection From Employment and Assistance, June 2014

The Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation released a report that summarizes interview data collected from 51 unmarried mothers in Southeast Michigan and Los Angeles, California. Interviews were conducted to learn about participant experiences with work, benefit receipt, overall wellbeing, material hardship, and economic coping strategies that are utilized.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/resource/understanding-the-dynamics-of-disconnection-from-employment-and-assistance?utm_source=OPRE+News%3A+June+5%2C+2014&utm_campaign=Jun+5th+Newsletter&utm_medi


Aspirations to Achievement: Men of Color and Community Colleges, April 2014

The Center for Community College Student Engagement released a report that explores college graduation achievement gaps by race and ethnicity. According to the authors, Black and Latino male students enroll in community colleges with higher aspirations than their White male counterparts; however, men of color complete community college degrees at a much lower rate than their white male counterparts. The report maintains that these disparities are embedded in the structure of existing programs, and community colleges should actively address this inequity by reimagining their programs.

For more information, please see: http://www.ccsse.org/docs/MOC_Special_Report.pdf


HHS, DOL and HUD Issue Joint Letter Encouraging Summer Youth Employment Efforts, April 2014

The Departments of Labor (DOL), Health and Human Services (DHHS), and Housing and Urban Development (HUD) have issued a letter to their respective customers encouraging partnerships among the network of state and local youth service and workforce development providers, human service agencies, and Public Housing Agencies to develop summer jobs programs for needy and at-risk youth that provide employment, educational experiences, and essential skills such as financial literacy and time management.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofa/resource/hhs-dol-and-hud-issue-joint-letter-encouraging-summer-youth-employment-efforts


Mentoring Young Parents: A Guidebook for Programs Helping Youth and Young Parents Navigate a Pathway to Self-Sufficiency, April 2014

The Employment and Training Administration, Department of Labor released a mentoring guidebook to be used within local workforce programs and agencies. The authors indicate that youth are more likely to achieve positive outcomes in academics, social settings, career development, health, and safety if they have supportive relationships with older adults. The guidebook is intended to assist in development and implementation of mentorship programs to improve employment, education, and training outcomes among youth.

For more information, please see: http://wdr.doleta.gov/research/FullText_Documents/Mentoring_Youth_and_Young_Parents_Guidebook.pdf


Resources for Working with LGBTQ Youth, April 2014

The Children's Bureau Express, Administration of Children and Families released a portal of resources, tools, and trainings for professionals in legal and child welfare communities to use to support outcomes for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth in foster care. The Web site also functions to provide increased clarity to LGBTQ youth regarding the child welfare system, their rights, and existing resources to deal with harassment, violence, discrimination, homelessness, and/or health.

For more information, please see: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=156&articleid=4190


The Plummeting Labor Market Fortunes of Teens and Young Adults, March 2014

The Brookings Institution recently released an interactive tool that takes a comprehensive look at the state of the job market for America's youth in the nation for each of the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas. Users are able to select a city from the dropdown menu and then view data about the specific employment rates, disconnected youth, race/ethnicity, education levels, and poverty status. Interested users are also able to download this information. The report also includes a number of strategies to reduce youth joblessness and labor force underutilization.

For more information, please see: http://www.brookings.edu/research/interactives/2014/labor-market-metro-areas-teens-young-adults?utm_campaign=Brookings+Brief&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=12223980&_hsenc=p2ANqtz--3


Using Brain Science to Improve Social Policies and Programs for Low-Income Families, January 2014

This paper, from the Crittenton Women's Union (CWU), discusses how executive functioning skills are important to move out of poverty. Executive functioning includes skills like impulse control, working memory, and mental flexibility. Persistent poverty can influence brain development and executive functioning and provide challenges for individuals as adults. The paper reviews how improving executive functioning can help promote positive outcomes and discusses how policy and programs can be developed to improve executive functioning.

For more information, please see: http://www.liveworkthrive.org/site/assets/Using%20Brain%20Science%20to%20Create%20Pathways%20Out%20of%20Poverty%20FINAL%20online.pdf


Building Better Programs, 2014

Created by the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP), the Building Better Programs initiative is a useful resource for TANF programs and other human services stakeholders looking to improve program strategies and offerings to better meet the needs of clients with reduced executive functioning. Available resources include webinars, research, practice summaries and links to additional information that offer techniques for identifying executive functioning challenges, assessing client needs and developing responsive programs.

For more information, please see: http://www.buildingbetterprograms.org/category/executive-function/


A Needs Assessment of Hispanic LGBT Older Adults, December 2013

The National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) released a report focusing on the needs of Hispanic elders who are LGBT. The authors conducted interviews and focus groups with this population, and found that many participants experience racial/ethnic and LGBT-based discrimination in housing and the workplace. These experiences negatively impacted their ability to secure employment and housing, thereby diminishing their ability to retire and increasing the likelihood of poverty during the later years of life. Results from the study also indicated that LGBT Hispanic elders experience social isolation from their families and various communities. NHCOA include a number of recommendations on ways to improve cultural competence, and increase access to healthcare and other services.

For more information, please see: http://www.nhcoa.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/NHCOA-Hispanic-LGBT-Older-Adult-Needs-Assessment-In-Their-Own-Words.pdf


Reentry Matters: Strategies and Successes of Second Chance Act Grantees Across the United States, November 2013

With over 95 percent of people in the nation's State prisons expected to be released at some point, officials at all levels of government recognize the need for initiatives to support the successful reentry of these individuals to their communities. The program snapshots released in this publication by the Council of State Governments illustrate the positive impact reentry initiatives can have by focusing on areas vital to successful reintegration back into the community, including employment, education, mentoring, and substance abuse and mental health treatment. Also highlighted are programs that address the needs of a particular population, such as women, youth and their families, and Tribal communities. Representing a wide range of populations served, these programs also demonstrate the diversity of approaches that can address recidivism and increase public safety.

For more information, please see: http://csgjusticecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/ReentryMatters.pdf


The Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP): Launching a Nationwide Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Effort, November 2013

The Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) was authorized by Congress to reduce teen pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections, and associated risk behaviors. Grantees across the country had flexibility in how they would implement their programs. This report is the first report from the PREP evaluation sponsored by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation and conducted by Mathematica Policy Research. Authors interviewed State grantee officials to document the program decisions made across 44 States and Washington DC in designing the program. Among the key findings, researchers found that many of the programs are evidence-based and targeting high-risk youth. Additionally, States have developed their programs in different ways to educate on abstinence and contraception. The evaluation will include an additional round of interviews in 2014, performance management data analysis, and an analysis of program impacts using random assignment across four to five sites.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/prep_eval_design_survey_report_102213.pdf


Feel the Heat: the Unrelenting Challenge of Young Black Male Unemployment, October 2013

This report from the Center of Law and Social Policy (CLASP) proposes several strategies to help turn the table for the thousands of young black men who are under- and unemployed. The report reflects on the current labor market situation of young black men and on policies and practices that can be leveraged to dramatically improve their labor market status.

For more information, please see: http://www.clasp.org/admin/site/publications/files/Feel-the-Heat_Web.pdf


New Guidance on Child Trafficking to Child Welfare Systems, September 2013

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families released two major announcements after the White House convened two events on human trafficking for national civil society leaders. In this announcement, Assistant Secretary Sheldon released new guidance on child trafficking to child welfare systems and runaway and homeless youth programs.

For more information, please see: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/blog/2013/09/much-anticipated-child-welfare-guidance-on-human-trafficking-released


Webinar: Providing Coordinated Human Services to Refugees and Immigrants through Specialized Service Units, September 2013

The Office of Refugee Resettlement hosted a Webinar entitled "Providing Coordinated Human Services to Refugees and Immigrants through Specialized Service Units." This free Webinar provided an opportunity to hear about specialized service units which are collaborations between ORR and refugee and immigrant serving programs and TANF programs designed to improve placements and services for low-income refugees and immigrants. Tom Medina from the Washington Department of Social and Health Services, Economic Services Administration, Office of Refugee and Immigrant Services presented on Washington's service delivery model and partner agencies, highlighted available services to low-income refugees and immigrants including TANF, English as a Second Language, job training, case management and many more essential services. The webinar emphasized lessons learned for effectively facilitating partnerships and reducing barriers to ORR and refugee and immigrant program collaboration with TANF, workforce development, and other agencies.

Click Here to View Webinar Slides [PDF - 379 KB]

Click Here to View Webinar Transcript [PDF - 260 KB]

Click Here to Listen to the Webinar Audio [WMV - 12,661 KB]

Click Here to View Webinar Q&A [PDF - 258 KB]


$5 Million in Grants Awarded to Assist Veterans, August 2013

The U.S. Department of Labor's Veterans' Employment and Training Service announced the award of 22 grants, totaling more than $5 million, to provide around 1,900 homeless female veterans and veterans with families with job training to help them succeed in civilian careers. The grants are being awarded under the department's Homeless Female Veterans and Veterans with Families Program. The services provided by grantees will include job placement, on-the-job and classroom training, career counseling, life skills and money management mentoring, as well as help in finding housing.

For more information, please see: http://www.dol.gov/opa/media/press/vets/vets20131575.htm


Webcast: U.S. Refugee Resettlement System, July 2013

The U.S. Department of Labor/Employment and Training Administration, Workforce3 One hosted a webcast that provided an overview of the U.S. Refugee Resettlement System, starting from selection to resettlement in the United States. During the webinar, the speakers discussed who is considered a U.S. refugee, how someone becomes a refugee, and how organizations can employ refugees.

For more information, please see: https://www.workforce3one.org/view/3001319850342568341/info


Webinar: Using Intensive Vocationally-Focused ESL to Fast-Track Workforce Development Skills for Refugees, May 2013

The Office of Refugee Resettlement hosted a Webinar, "Using Intensive Vocationally-Focused ESL to Fast-Track Workforce Development Skills for Refugees." The Webinar provided an overview of the Vocational English as a Second Language Immersion Program (VIP) program. The VIP program is a collaboration between the San Francisco Human Services Agency (HSA) and the City College of San Francisco (CCSF). The Webinar highlighted the VIP's eighteen week intensive English language immersion program that is focused on teaching the vocabulary and the cultural norms of the work place.

View ORR Webinar PowerPoint [PDF - 867 KB]

View ORR Webinar Transcript [PDF - 239 KB]


Advancing the Well-Being and Self-Sufficiency of At-Risk Youth, March 2013

Produced as part of the Youth Demonstration Development project for the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, this report presents a conceptual framework for efforts to prepare at-risk youth for healthy adult functioning and self-sufficiency. The framework explains how we can build our knowledge about what works for at-risk youth, by implementing and testing research-informed interventions to promote youths' resilience and human capital. An issue brief summarizes the framework.

To view this report, please see: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com/publications/PDFs/family_support/YDD_fnlrpt.pdf

To view this issue brief, please see: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com/publications/PDFs/family_support/YDD_Framework_IB.pdf


Office of Family Assistance (OFA) TANF Program Policy: Drug Convictions, March 2013

A new question and answer has been posted to the Office of Family Assistance Web site (see Question two of the Q & A: Drug Convictions). This item responds to the question as to whether or not an individual with a felony drug conviction can receive TANF non-assistance services.

To view this Q & A, please see: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofa/resource/q-a-drug-convictions


The Employment Prospects of Formerly Incarcerated People and Off-the-Books Work, February 2013

The Institute of Research on Poverty (IRP) hosted Mr. Bryan Sykes, a sociologist at DePaul University, to talk about some of the barriers that former inmates encounter when trying to find work, as well as how the costs of incarceration disproportionately affect young African American men. He also talks about his work on off-the-books labor and how former inmates still face heavy discrimination to the informal economy.

Listen to the Podcast

Read the Transcript


A Guide to Evidence and Innovation, 2013

As an extension of their page, FindYouth.gov has provided a resource titled "A Guide to Evidence and Innovation." With more and more funding sources for youth programs requiring the implementation of evidence-based programs, this resource helps you know where to look and what to look for when trying to find an evidence-based program that fits your organization and population.

For more information, please see: http://evidence-innovation.findyouthinfo.gov/


Executive Function: Skills for Life and Learning, 2013

This video and companion brief provide an overview of what executive function is and how it affects one's life-long capacity to learn. It explains how these skills develop, what can disrupt their development, and how supporting them can pay off in school, work and life.

For more information, please see: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/multimedia/videos/inbrief_series/inbrief_executive_function/


Pathways for Youth: Draft Strategic Plan for Federal Collaboration, 2013

The Interagency Working Group on Youth Programs (Working Group) is comprised of twelve Federal departments and five Federal agencies that support activities that focus on youth. This report, Pathways for Youth, is a first step to help the partners address their common goals for youth, elevate strong models of youth programs, policies, and other supports, and articulate areas for future collaborative work with and for youth. The Working Group solicited input from a wide range of stakeholders, including young people, families, schools, nonprofit organizations, State Children's Cabinet directors, government organizations at the Federal, State, and local levels, and others. Several themes emerged from the input, which are crafted into a vision for youth. This vision acknowledges the importance of pathways to opportunity for youth that include meaningful connections and safe, healthy, and stable places to live, learn, and work. Pathways for Youth considers all youth, with an emphasis on the most vulnerable youth, particularly those who are disconnected from school, work, or family.

For more information, please see: http://www.findyouthinfo.gov/docs/Pathways_for_Youth.pdf


Poverty Impedes Cognitive Function, 2013

This paper hypothesizes that poverty directly impedes cognitive function and shares findings from two studies, one about finances and the other tracking farmers over a planting cycle, that test this hypothesis. The authors suggest that because poverty-related concerns consume mental resources, individuals focus less on other tasks. The authors discuss policy implications for their findings.

For more information, please see: http://psych.princeton.edu/~psych/psychology/research/shafir/pubs/PovertyImpedesCognitiveFunction.pdf


Reintegration After Deployment: Supporting Citizen Warriors and Their Families, 2013

A study released by the RAND Corporation addresses challenges that reserve component service members and their families face after deployment, and the factors that contribute to successful reintegration, a process that is critical to the well-being of the individual and their family. The report provides a series of recommendations for the U.S. Department of Defense.

For more information, please see: http://www.rand.org/pubs/research_briefs/RB9730.html


The 2013 Annual Homeless Assessment Report (AHAR) to Congress, 2013

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) reported in its national estimate of homelessness in the U.S. that there have been reductions in every major category or subpopulation since 2010, the year the Federal government established "Opening Doors," a strategic plan to end homelessness. HUD's 2013 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress finds significant and measureable progress to reduce the scale of long-term or "chronic" homelessness as well as homelessness experienced by veterans and families. Based on data reported by more than 3,000 cities and counties, last January's one-night estimate reveals a 24 percent drop in homelessness among veterans and a 16 percent reduction among individuals experiencing long-term or chronic homelessness since 2010.

For more information, please see: https://www.onecpd.info/resources/documents/AHAR-2013-Part1.pdf


Trauma-Informed Care for Women Veterans Experiencing Homelessness: A Guide for Service Providers, 2013

The U.S. Department of Labor released a "Trauma Guide" that was created to address the psychological and mental health needs of women veterans. This guide is also a compilation of best practices aimed at improving effectiveness in engaging female veterans. Written for service providers, the guide offers observational knowledge and concrete guidelines for modifying practices with the goal of increasing re-entry outcomes.

For more information, please see: http://www.dol.gov/wb/trauma/WBTraumaGuide2011.pdf


Updated Data for Persons Defined as Economically Disadvantaged Youth and Adults, 2013

The U.S. Department of Labor, Employment & Training Administration has issued special tabulations of combined five-year samples (2006-2011 data) of the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey (ACS). These special tabulations include separate sets of tables for the nation, States, counties and other types of localities. The Workforce Investment Act (WIA) requires States to use data on economically disadvantaged youth and adults win their within-State allocation formulas.

For more information, please see: http://www.doleta.gov/budget/disadvantagedYouthAdults.cfm


Implementing Work Programs for Poor Men, November 2012

This paper explores how work levels among low-income men can be raised as they have been for mothers on welfare. The paper reviews existing literature and research on work programs for low-skilled men and finds that many states have men's work programs, often on a small scale. The author suggests that programs should stress work over training and be combined with improved wage subsidies.

For more information, please see: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1541-0072.2012.00465.x/abstract


Tips for Working with People Experiencing Homelessness, January 2012

The National Transitional Jobs Network (NTJN) released a report that focuses on the designing and implementing of transitional jobs (TJ) programs that serve individuals experiencing homelessness. This report is particularly beneficial for TJ practitioners looking to better serve their participants who are experiencing homelessness, homeless service providers considering TJ as a potential employment services model, and anyone interested in how the TJ model can be used to provide access to employment for people experiencing homelessness.

For more information, please see: http://www.scribd.com/doc/79391645/NTJN-Homelessness-Brief-Jan-2012-v2


Stressing Out the Poor: Chronic Physiological Stress and the Income-Achievement Gap, December 2011

Chronically stressful situations have an accumulated impact in the psychological, economic and physical development of children. From reducing a child's ability to perform well in school to reducing a child's ability to successfully grow and enter the workforce, adverse childhood experiences effect various areas of development and overtime individuals are unable to respond to typical life activities, e.g., school, training, work and family formation. The authors find that childhood socioeconomic disadvantage leads to deficits in academic achievement and occupational attainment and describe a model for addressing the challenges and decreasing the influences of deficits.

For more information, please see: https://web.stanford.edu/group/scspi/_media/pdf/pathways/winter_2011/PathwaysWinter11_Evans.pdf


TANF Recipients with Barriers to Employment, August 2011

This issue brief was authored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation and the Urban Institute. Authors provide an overview of how prevalent barriers to work are in the TANF population. Most TANF recipients have at least one barrier to work and many have multiple barriers, and the likelihood of securing work decreases with the number of barriers that an individual faces. Strategies to help mitigate these barriers include employment-focused and treatment-focused strategies, but even still a large proportion of this population remains out of work.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/barries_employ.pdf


Working with Low-Income Families: Lessons Learned from Basic and Applied Research on Coping with Poverty-Related Stress, June 2011

With the understanding that adverse childhood experiences and chronic stress reduce social, physical and economic well-being, the author discusses emerging research on the causal role of poverty-related stress on individuals and provides a series of recommendations for addressing chronic stressors. A multi-faceted approach is recommended to respond to individuals' diverse needs relating to social, physical, emotional and economic circumstances. The research offers a foundation for human services programs working with low-income families seeking ways to address chronic stress among clients.

For more information, please see: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10879-011-9192-2


U.S. Refugee Resettlement Assistance, 2011

This document, from the Congressional Research Service, provides an overview of the Federal program available to assist refugees when they enter the United States. It also highlights some of the challenges unique to refugees and the impact that existing policies and program have on refugees. This document would be helpful to TANF stakeholders interested in learning more about refugee resettlement resources and potentially partnering with refugee serving organizations and government agencies.

For more information, please see: http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/row/R41570.pdf


Helping Homeless Individuals with Co-Occurring Disorders: The Four Components, 2010

This article from the journal Social Work highlights four practical steps for practitioners when working with homeless individuals struggling with mental illness and substance abuse issues. This population is particularly vulnerable and often hard to serve. Of interest to TANF professionals is a section related to connecting these individuals with employment. The author cites a number of research studies which shed light on best practices for connecting homeless individuals with co-occurring disorders with employment and other services.

For more information, please see: http://sw.oxfordjournals.org/content/57/1/23.full.pdf+html


Resource Guide for Serving Refugees with Disabilities, July 2007

The U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants released a resource guide for service providers who work with refugees with disabilities in communities. The authors note that many refugees that flee to the U.S. come from poorer regions with high rates of disabilities, so some refugees require specialized services to best suit their needs. The goal of the resource guide is to disseminate research that will enhance orientation and case management services for refugees with disabilities.

For more information, please: Click Here


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2-Parent Families

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Child Only

Children in Poverty by Race and Ethnicity, May 2014

The Kids Count Data Center, a project of the Annie E. Casey Foundation, released a tool that provides data on children in poverty by race and ethnicity from 2008-2012. Users may filter the information by state, city, territory, or race. Information may be viewed in a table, map, line graph, or bar graph.

For more information, please see: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/data/tables/44-children-in-poverty-by-race-and-ethnicity?loc=1&loct=2#detailed/2/2-52/false/868,867,133,38,35/10,11,9,12,1,13,185/324,323


National Child Abuse Prevention Media Toolkit, April 2014

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Children's Bureau recently released a media toolkit that includes materials to spread the message about preventing child maltreatment and to promote well-being. April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month, and the toolkit contains several media strategies to help organizations and community partnerships spread the word about events, reach potential supporters, and build relationships. The toolkit contains sample messages for Facebook posts, tweets, press releases, PSAs, and e-mail signatures.

For more information, please see: https://www.childwelfare.gov/preventing/preventionmonth/media-toolkit/


The Negative Effects of Instability on Child Development: A Research Synthesis, September 2013

The Urban Institute released a paper discussing the negative effects of instability on child development. This paper reviewed and synthesized research on five areas of instability: family income, parental employment, family structure, housing, and the out-of-home contexts of school and child care. It also discusses some of the key pathways through which instability may affect development and provides recommendations for policy and practice to alleviate instability's impact. In addition to the report, the Urban Institute released a fact sheet that highlights the key findings from the report.

To view this report, please see:: http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412899-The-Negative-Effects-of-Instability-on-Child-Development.pdf

To view this Fact Sheet, please see:: http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412908-The-Negative-Effects-of-Instability-on-Child-Development.pdf


Child Support Program Engages Veteran and Military Families, May 2013

About 6 percent of the national child support caseload involves a veteran or an active military member.

For more information, please see: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/blog/2013/05/child-support-program-engages-veteran-and-military-families


Keeping Children Safe and Helping Families Find Quality Child Care, May 2013

The Department of Health and Human Services proposes new child care regulations that will better ensure children's health and safety in child care and promote school readiness.

For more information, please see: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/blog/2013/05/keeping-children-safe-and-helping-families-find-quality-child-care


Change Management in the Child Support Program, February 2013

Child support has steadily evolved over the decades from a welfare cost-recovery model to a major family support program in a technologically savvy environment.

For more information, please see: http://tinyurl.com/ChildSupportProgram


Early Childhood and Family Homelessness Resource List, January 2013

The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) has released an early childhood and family homelessness resource list in order to reinforce the importance of access to quality early childhood services for young homeless children and their families. The resources listed clarify policy options for State Administrators of Child Care and Head Start Directors to ensure that more young children and their families are served in child care and Head Start programs.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/occ/acf_homeless_resource_list.pdf


TANF and Child Welfare Collaboration Discretionary Grant Cluster, 2013

Child Welfare Information Gateway has developed a web section that lists the grantees from the TANF and Child Welfare Collaboration discretionary grant program which ran from 2006 to 2011. The purpose of the grant program was to demonstrate models of effective collaboration between TANF and child welfare agencies to improve outcomes for at risk children and youth. The web page contains a summary of each program, their project descriptions, site visit highlights, lessons learned, and outcomes found, as well as contact information for each program.

For more information, please see: https://www.childwelfare.gov/management/funding/funding_sources/tanfcw.cfm


The Long Reach of Early Childhood Poverty: Pathways and Impacts, December 2011

The Center on the Developing Child from Harvard University released a Question and Answer sheet assessing the "Long Reach of Early Childhood Poverty" report. The report was authored by Greg Duncan and Katherine Magnuson. This piece reviews the evidence linking early childhood poverty to long-lasting consequences and discusses strategies to combat the effects of poverty-induced stress on vulnerable families with young children. The new data shows that when children experience poverty, it affects their later-life outcomes. Children's eventual labor market success appears to be compromised much more by poverty experienced early, rather than later, in childhood.

For more information, please see: http://www.stanford.edu/group/scspi/_media/pdf/pathways/winter_2011/PathwaysWinter11_Duncan.pdf

To view this Q & A, please click here.


Kinship Care and Child-Only Cases, 2011

This presentation from Kathy Deserly of the National Resource Center for Tribes was given at the Region X Tribal TANF Conference in September of 2011. The presentation focuses on the different types of kinship care, how it is used in the child welfare and TANF systems, and advantages and challenges of kinship care. Ms. Deserly highlights characteristics of child-only cases within the TANF caseload and makes suggestions for addressing the specific and unique needs of this population.

For more information, please see: https://peerta.acf.hhs.gov/uploadedFiles/Kathy%20Deserly.pdf


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Disabilities and SSI

Assessing and Serving TANF Recipients with Disabilities, February 2014

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation released a brief that describes different approaches to disability-related needs assessment used by some TANF programs. The TANF/SSI Disability Transition Project aims to bridge gaps between the two programs, support TANF recipients with disabilities as they seek employment, and aid SSI applicants who apply for rewards. The brief also offers options for TANF administrators to consider when choosing assessment approaches, such as a vocational assessment, which enables TANF agencies to focus on what clients can do instead of what they cannot do as a result of their disability, or an in-home assessment, which allows social workers to appropriately evaluate what a client can and cannot do safely in the home.

For more information, please see: https://www.opressrc.org/content/assessing-and-serving-tanf-recipients-disabilities


Connections Between TANF and SSI: Lessons from the TANF/SSI Disability Transition Project, February 2014

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation released a brief that provides an overall summary of the lessons learned from the TANF-SSI Disability Transition Project. The TANF/SSI Disability Transition Project aims to bridge gaps between the two programs, support TANF recipients with disabilities as they seek employment, and aid SSI applicants who apply for rewards. This brief brings together material spread across other documents in a concise format, and offers new insights from State-level data analyses that largely back up the conclusions drawn from Federal data.

For more information, please see: https://www.opressrc.org/content/connections-between-tanf-and-ssi-lessons-tanfssi-disability-transition-project


Examining the Interaction Between Welfare and Disability: Lessons from an In-Depth Data Analysis, February 2014

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation released a brief that focuses on the analysis of merged national-level SSI data and TANF data from the 26 States that report to the Office of Family Assistance (OFA) on their full TANF caseload. The authors noted that, counter to popular narratives, the overlap between the two programs was small. It also found that TANF recipients who applied for SSI were not at particularly high risk of losing their TANF benefits. Finally, the authors stated that medical award rates among TANF recipients who applied for SSI were comparable to that of SSI applicants who had not recently received TANF, once important age differences were taken into account.

For more information, please see: https://www.opressrc.org/content/examining-interaction-between-welfare-and-disability-lessons-depth-data-analysis


Understanding Supplemental Security Income (SSI): A Guide for TANF Staff Members, February 2014

The Administration of Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) released a brief that describes the basic SSI disability determination process and compares and contrasts it with several procedures different TANF agencies use to identify recipients who meet TANF work-limitation criteria in States or localities. It goes on to discuss topics including different strategies TANF agencies use to assess which individuals are most likely to qualify for SSI.

For more information, please see: https://www.opressrc.org/content/understanding-supplemental-security-income-ssi-guide-tanf-staff-members


Project SEARCH, December 2013

Project SEARCH, run by Cincinnati Children's, provides employability skills training and workplace internships for individuals with significant disabilities, particularly youth transitions from high school to adult life. Project SEARCH now has program sites throughout the United States and the United Kingdom, and works with youth with chronic illnesses, traumatic injuries, rehabilitation issues, and other disabilities, and generates a plan that addresses their vocational, educational, training, and employment goals.

For more information, please see: http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/service/p/project-search/vocational/


The Earnings Consequences of the Americans with Disabilities Act on People with Disabilities, November 2013

Mathematica Policy Research released a report that discusses the Congress' attempt to improve labor market outcomes of individuals with disabilities by passing the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). While studies have shown that immediately following the enactment of the ADA, wages of people with disabilities decreased, the longer term wage consequences of the ADA have yet to be studied. Using data from the March CPS, this paper shows that the ADA led to a longer term increase in the weekly wages of individuals with disabilities, and the wage effect of the ADA varies according to level of education.

For more information, please see: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com/publications/pdfs/disability/earning_consequences_WP.pdf


Strength in Our Differences – Annual Progress Report, October 2013

The National Council on Disability (NCD) released their Annual Survey of Federal Disability Policy – "Strength in Our Differences." The NCD is an independent Federal agency that recommends disability policy to the President, Congress, and other Federal agencies. It released its yearly report on the nation's progress in achieving equality of opportunity, independent living, full participation, and economic self-sufficiency for an estimated 57 million Americans with disabilities.

For more information, please see: http://www.ncd.gov/rawmedia_repository/89dce323_2132_4e1d_94d9_d7e4c2d00884


The New Safety Net? Supplemental Security Income after Welfare Reform, September 2013

The Department of Economics from Williams College released a paper in their working papers series discussing the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program, a federally-funded income support program for disabled individuals. The paper uses State panel data to examine the relationships between welfare reform and SSI disabled caseloads for both adults and children. The paper also examines whether the relationship between SSI participation and other factors has been altered after welfare reform. Results are provided that suggest that welfare reform significantly increases SSI participation.

For more information, please see: http://web.williams.edu/Economics/wp/schmidt_ssi_sept_2013_final.pdf


Real World Scenario Provides Valuable Training to Disability Staff, August 2013

The Employment Training Administration's Disability Employment Initiative developed hypothetical case scenarios and video vignettes that help Disability Resource Coordinators and other project staff connect strategies for serving persons with disabilities to overarching customer service strategies. The vignettes touch upon real-life situations that staff faces with their customers such as: How can enrollment in Workforce Investment Act services assist in providing the full range of services to their customers?

For more information, please see: https://disability.workforce3one.org/page/tag/1001321461898858783


The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families – Supplemental Security Income (TANF-SSI) Disability Transition Project, August 2013

A recent Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation report examines two income support programs that are important for many low-income people with disabilities.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/blog/2013/08/the-tanf-ssi-disability-transition-project


Persons With a Disability: Labor Force Characteristics – 2012 News Release, June 2013

The United States Department of Labor has released data on the characteristics of persons with a disability The data on persons with a disability are collected as part of the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly sample survey of about 60,000 households that provides information on employment and unemployment in the United States. Highlights from the data are listed in the report, as well as demographic, employment, unemployment, and labor force characteristics.

For more information, please see: http://www.bls.gov/news.release/archives/disabl_06122013.htm


The Intersection of Welfare and Disability, May 2013

This report from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, written by MDRC, provides early findings from the on-going TANF/SSI Disability Transition Project, which is sponsored by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. This particular report examines how TANF agencies serve those with disabilities and how these agencies work with Social Security Administration offices. Data is also included about the overlap between the two populations and the process and timeline for TANF participants receiving a disability determination after applying for benefits.

Click here for more information.


Ticket to Work Participants: Then and Now, May 2013

Mathematica issued an information brief entitled, "Ticket to Work Participants: Then and Now." Created by Congress to help beneficiaries with disabilities find employment, the Ticket to Work (TTW) program was revised in 2008 to make it more attractive to employment service providers. This brief discusses how the TTW participant population has changed under the revised regulations, and examines how the regulations may have affected beneficiaries' service use, employment outcomes, and satisfaction with TTW.

For more information, please see: https://disability.workforce3one.org/view/2001313650766211919


Grants Available to Improve Disability Employment, April 2013

The United States Department of Labor announced on April 22, 2013 the availability of nearly $18 million in grants to improve educational, training and employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. The grants represent the fourth round of funding through the Disability Employment Initiative, which is jointly funded and administered by two Labor Department agencies, the Employment and Training Administration and the Office of Disability Employment Policy. To date, the department has awarded grants totaling more than $63 million in 23 States.

To apply, please see: http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do?mode=VIEW&oppId=231216


Improving Employment Outcomes and Community Integration for Veterans with Disabilities, April 2013

MDRC released a policy brief describing an innovative program designed to target the psychological and social behaviors that contribute to pain, disability, and inactivity among veterans with disabilities. The goal is to help these veterans resume daily activities and get on a path to work.

To view this policy brief, please see: http://www.mdrc.org/sites/default/files/improving_employment_pgap.pdf


Lessons for Programs Serving Transition-Age Youth: A Comparative Analysis, April 2013

The Center for Studying Disability Policy and Mathematica Policy Research released a report summarizing policies and programs that the United States and 10 other Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) countries are using to provide income support and vocational rehabilitation to transition-age youth with disabilities. The report examines common barriers that inhibit a large portion of young Americans with disabilities from transitioning into adulthood with gainful and stable employment. The four major themes that emerged from the report are: 1) a range of efforts have been made to promote employment, 2) investment in large-scale pilot projects have been helpful to governments to identify what works, 3) most countries are operating programs at various government levels designed to improve access to adult services for people with disabilities, and 4) all countries have actively pursued solutions to the problem of inadequate coordination of youth and adult services.

For more information, please see: http://mathematica-mpr.com/publications/PDFs/disability/Youth_Transition_WP.pdf?spMailingID=6150368&spUserID=NDI3MDM5NDA5NzkS1&spJobID=73615626&spReportId=NzM2MTU2MjYS1


The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the U.S. Health and Human Services Partner to Service Low-Income People with Disabilities, February 2013

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recently announced approximately $98 million in funding for 13 State housing agencies for rental assistance to extremely low-income persons with disabilities, many of whom are transitioning out of institutional settings or are at high risk of homelessness. The aim of the partnership and funding support is to prevent thousands of people with disabilities from experiencing homelessness or unnecessary institutionalization.

For more information, please see: http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2013pres/02/20130212b.html


Youth Transition Demonstration: Lifting Employment Barriers for Youth with Disabilities, February 2013

The Center for Studying Disability Policy released an issue brief discussing the Youth Transition Demonstration (YTD). This study analyzes the interim findings of the YTD project evaluation, and the impact the project evaluation had on paid employment and earnings of youth with disabilities. The study identifies key components of the YTD project and further provides insight into the project for young people with disabilities.

For more information, please see: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com/publications/PDFs/disability/YTD_Brief13-01.pdf


Linking Youth Transition Support Services: Results from Two Demonstration Projects, January 2013

The U.S. Social Security Administration, Office of Retirement and Disability Policy, released an article presenting an overview of two projects in the Social Security Administration's Youth Transition Demonstrations: California's Bridges to Youth Self-Sufficiency and Mississippi's Model Youth Transition Innovation. These programs provided transitional assistance for youth with disabilities who are entitled to Social Security benefits. Key outcomes are reported in the article, along with highlights from two youth who successfully completed the programs.

For more information, please see: http://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/ssb/v73n1/v73n1p59.pdf


Disability Employment Publications, 2013

Offered by the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), this Web site lists a wide variety of guides and toolkits for professionals interested in connecting individuals with disabilities with employment. Each publication can be viewed online, or a free copy may be ordered through the mail. Publications include posters, brochures for individuals with disabilities, and tips sheets for professionals.

For more information, please see: http://promotions.usa.gov/odep.html


Fast Facts & Figures About Social Security, 2013

The Social Security Administration (SSA) released a publication titled, "Fast Facts & Figures About Social Security, 2013." This publication answers the most frequently asked questions about SSA administered programs. It highlights basic program data for the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income Programs. Tables and charts are included to illustrate the range of program beneficiaries.

For more information, please see: http://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/chartbooks/fast_facts/2013/fast_facts13.pdf


National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth, 2013

This link provides a quick reference to all legislation related to workforce and disability initiatives. This is a reference for TANF stakeholders who may need a refresher as to what specific legislation provides funding and services for those with disabilities. Summaries of each law are provided as well as links to the actual legislation.

For more information, please see: http://www.ncwd-youth.info/legislation/all#acw


Supplemental Security Income, Welfare Reform, and the Recession, 2013

This short paper examines the effects the Great Recession had on both TANF and SSI take up rates. It also examines the effect that welfare reform had on SSI rates and concludes that since welfare reform in 1996, SSI has been playing a larger part in the general safety net for low-income individuals and families.

For more information, please see: http://www.bostonfed.org/commdev/c&b/2013/spring/supplemental-security-income-welfare-reform-and-the-recession.pdf


The Office of Disability Employment Policy Announces the Release of "Soft Skills to Pay the Bills" Video Series, 2013

The U.S. Department of Labor's Office of Disability Employment Policy released the "Soft Skills to Pay the Bills" Video Series and discussion guide on DVD. The activities in this publication were created to provide an introduction to the "basics" of soft skills. These materials have been designed with youth service professionals in mind – specifically those working with in-school and out-of-school youth, ages 14 to 21, on career and workforce readiness skills. The basic foundation for the structure of these activities includes convenience, cost-effectiveness, and creativity.

For more information, please see: http://promotions.usa.gov/odep.html#youth


Back to Work: Recent SSA Employment Demonstrations for People with Disabilities, June 2012

This report summarizes the short term effects of four current demonstration projects from the Social Security Administration (SSA) on the self-sufficiency of recipients of SSI and SSDI. The random assignment evaluations of these projects will measure long term effects of the demonstration projects when completed. The short term impacts show a slight increase in employment for this population and highlight some of the common challenges these individuals face.

For more information, please see: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com/publications/pdfs/disability/backtowork_ib.pdf


Integrated Employment, EmploymentFirst, and U.S. Federal Policy, 2012

This article provides a historical look at federal policy as it relates to the employment of people with disabilities over the last 40 years. Of particular interest to TANF stakeholders is the descriptions of integrated employment and EmploymentFirst, two strategies that the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) has promoted to assist individuals with serious disabilities connect with work.

For more information, please see: http://www.dol.gov/odep/pdf/20130501-martinez.pdf


Reentry Programs for Students with Disabilities in the Juvenile Justice System: Four State Approaches, December 2011

This article briefly reviews research on transition challenges for youth with disabilities in the juvenile justice system and supports needed to become self-sufficient. Profiles of four State programs are provided, including program models, results, funding, and evaluation efforts. From the four example States, common themes are identified for future work.

For more information, please see: http://nasdse.org/DesktopModules/DNNspot-Store/ProductFiles/66_0082f096-5a9d-49f7-a2c1-c6ff737af209.pdf


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Domestic Violence

Domestic Violence Counts Census Report: 2013, 2014

This annual report put together by the National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) showcases the numbers and statistics from a point-in-time count of those receiving services from domestic violence organizations across the country. Eighty-seven percent of all identified domestic violence programs participated in the survey and provided information ranging from how many people were residing in shelters to the needs expressed that could not be met by program resources. Information for each state is included, and NNEDV's website provides links to summaries for each state as well as an appendix related specifically to the economic stability of domestic violence survivors.

For more information, please see: http://nnedv.org/projects/census/4225-domestic-violence-counts-census-2013-report.html


Domestic Violence: Understanding the Basics, 2014

The Administration for Children and Families, Family Violence Prevention and Services Program put together a one hour interactive eLearning module that provides information about domestic violence. It covers the dynamics and common tactics that characterize domestic violence, provides an overview of the scope and impact on individuals and society, explores the underlying factors that allow domestic violence to exist, offers insight into the various risks and choices that survivors face, and shares how to be part of the solution.

For more information, please see: http://www.vawnet.org/elearning/DVBasics/player.html


National Indigenous Women's Resource Center, 2014

The National Indigenous Women's Resource Center (NIWRC) is part of the Domestic Violence Resource Network funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to inform and strengthen domestic violence intervention and prevention efforts at the individual, community, and societal levels. NIWRC provides information, research, training and technical assistance specifically to Native communities as they seek to address and eliminate violence within their communities.

For more information, please see: http://www.niwrc.org/


Safety Evaluation for Battered Women: A Resource Packet for Advocates, Practitioners, and Policymakers, 2014

This resource packet contains guidance on integrating safety planning into policies, programs, and program evaluations. In addition, this packet of resources was compiled to guide advocates, systems practitioners, and policymakers on innovative thinking about the safety of women in surrounding communities. The resource offers a broadened perspective on safety evaluation for battered women and their children.

For more information, please see: http://www.praxisinternational.org/praxis_materials.aspx


Workplace Toolkit: Domestic and Sexual Violence, 2014

The Workplaces Respond to Domestic and Sexual Violence: A National Resource Center is funded by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women and features a plethora of tools for employers looking to provide workplace responses to domestic violence. The Workplace toolkit helps to raise awareness, address employment issues and connect people in workplaces to the assistance they may need.

For more information, please see: http://www.workplacesrespond.org/implement/workplace-toolkit


Domestic Violence 101 e-Learning Course, March 2013

The Administration for Children and Families Family Violence Prevention and Services Program is pleased to announce the launch of Domestic Violence: Understanding the Basics, an online learning tool. This one-hour interactive eLearning module describes the dynamics and common tactics that characterize domestic violence, provides an overview of the scope and impact on individuals and society, explores the underlying factors that allow domestic violence to exist, offers insight into the various risks and choices that survivors face, and shares how to be part of the solution.

To view this online tool, please see: http://www.vawnet.org/elearning/DVBasics/player.html


Healthy Hispanic Marriage Initiative Grantee Implementation Evaluation: Addressing Domestic Violence in Hispanic Healthy Relationship Programs, March 2013

This report from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation uses qualitative data to examine how program sites addressed domestic violence within the context of healthy relationship and family strengthening programs in Hispanic communities. The common theme found throughout all programs was that domestic violence was treated with the seriousness it requires. Issues to consider when addressing domestic violence with Hispanic families are included as well as example domestic violence screens.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/resource/hhmi-grantee-implementation-evaluation-addressing-domestic-violence-in-0


The Role of Economic Factors and Economic Support in Preventing and Escaping from Intimate Partner Violence, October 2012

This article provides a thorough overview of the existing research related to how poor economic situations contribute to intimate partner violence. The authors explain how low socio-economic status, unemployment, career stress, and poverty are associated with rates and severity of violence. Research is also provided that shows what mitigates these factors. This document would be helpful to TANF stakeholders interested in learning how participation in TANF can help survivors of violence and why poverty can exacerbate violence.

For more information, please see: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pam.21666/pdf


Assets for Independence (AFI) Serving Domestic Violence Survivors Toolkit, April 2012

The Federal government has recently placed a greater emphasis on connecting survivors with asset building programs as a way to build financial independence for the population. With this goal in mind, this toolkit was designed as a step by step guide for both AFI programs and domestic violence service providers interested in creating partnerships. It provides information targeted specifically at each partners, as well as additional resources such as draft MOUs and letters of commitments.

For more information, please see: http://idaresources.acf.hhs.gov/servlet/servlet.FileDownload?file=01570000001bh8JAAQ


Helping Children and Teens Cope with the Effects of Domestic Violence: Fostering Healing and Resilience, March 2012

On Thursday, May 3, 2012 from 1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m. EST, the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health will host its third webinar of its 2012 Trauma Informed Webinar Series. This webinar will focus on strategies for working with children and teens who are affected by domestic violence. The webinar will cover the following topics:

  • Affects of domestic violence on a child’s development;
  • Methods for strengthening children’s and teens’ adaptive coping and resilience skills; and
  • Overall training methods for working with children and teens affected by domestic violence.

The presenter for this webinar is Susan Blumenfeld, MSW, LCSW. Ms. Blumenfeld is the Child Trauma Director at the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health.

Click here for more information.


Impact of Intimate Partner Violence on Economic Well-Being, 2011

This research brief from the Center for Financial Security at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provides a thorough overview of the impact of domestic violence on the economic well-being of women. Domestic violence negatively impacts women in a variety of ways, many of which have financial and employment-related implications. For TANF stakeholders wishing to understand how domestic violence directly impacts the employment and financial security of a victim, this brief provides a condensed review of publish research on the topic.

For more information, please see: http://www.cfs.wisc.edu/briefs/Tolman2011_ImpactBrief.pdf


State Employment Protection Statutes for Victims of Domestic Violence as an Employment Matter, 2011

This discussion paper from the University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research provides analysis of state statutes related to employment protection for survivors of domestic violence. Domestic violence is often not viewed as a workplace concern, but as this report highlights, it can be a huge barrier to employment, safety, and ultimately, self-sufficiency. Example policies are provided, as well as implications for employers, human service professionals, and policy makers.

For more information, please see: http://www.ukcpr.org/Publications/DP2010-11.pdf


Assessing the Risk of Intimate Partner Violence, January 2010

This Crime Victims' Institute resource describes the strengths and limitations of several intimate partner violence (IPV) risk assessment instruments, including the Danger Assessment and Ontario Domestic Assault Risk Assessment. In addition, it summarizes a few studies that examined the predictive validity of various risk assessment instruments. Finally, it describes how risk assessment instruments are being used as part of IPV response protocols by first responders in certain States.

For more information, please see: http://www.ncdsv.org/images/CVI_Assessing-the-Risk-of-IPV_1-2010.pdf


Savings Outcomes of an IDA Program for Survivors of Domestic Violence, 2010

This study examined the outcomes of an IDA program for survivors of domestic violence based in St. Louis, Missouri. The majority of the women involved in the program were able to save money and made matched withdrawals from their account. This demonstrated that IDA programs can be used successfully with survivors of domestic violence.

For more information, please see: http://csd.wustl.edu/Publications/Documents/RP10-42.pdf


Training Forums from the Office on Violence Against Women, January 2009

This is a Web-based training and education program that was developed by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women and Witness Justice, to address issues facing professionals that work with survivors of domestic violence. The online curriculum includes training on working with undocumented survivors, promoting cultural competency, and providing Trauma and Trauma-Informed Care. Since TANF professionals are often faced with participants that may have experienced domestic violence, these training courses can support effective service delivery.

For more information, please see: http://trainingforums.org/


TANF Workers' Responses to Battered Women and the Impact of Brief Worker Training: What Survivors Report, February 2005

This article summarizes a Michigan study that surveyed battered women's experiences with their TANF caseworkers around intimate partner violence (IPV) discussion and safety planning. Battered women were asked a series of questions surveying the experience level of the worker. Results from the report concluded that trained workers were more likely than untrained workers to discuss the women's fear and physical harm and to help them develop a safety plan. In addition, trained workers were generally perceived as more helpful.

For more information, please see: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16043548


Lethality Assessment Program- Maryland Model (LAP), 2005

The Maryland Network against Domestic Violence (MNADV) site provides an overview of the Lethality Assessment Program--Maryland Model (LAP). It also includes information about implementation of the model nationally. Created by MNADV in 2005, LAP is based on the Danger Assessment, a protocol created by Dr. Jacquelyn Campbell. Together with LAP, service providers use a tool called the Lethality Screen for First Responders -- an evidence-based series of questions -- used to assess an individual suspected of being in danger. Jurisdictions in at least 31 States have implemented LAP.

For more information, please see: http://mnadv.org/lethality/what-is-lap/


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Foster Care/Independent Living

New Resources to Support the Financial Well-being of Youth in Foster Care, December 2014

The Children's Bureau and Office of Community Services developed a toolkit entitled "A Financial Empowerment Toolkit for Youth and Young Adults in Foster Care." This toolkit aims to provide caseworkers, care providers, foster parents, and other adults with strategies and resources to help youth improve their approaches to gaining financial competence.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/blog/2014/12/new-resources-to-support-the-financial-well-being-of-youth-in-foster-care


Housing for Youth Aging Out of Foster Care, May 2014

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) released a report that summarizes a study conducted to equip policymakers with recommendations and improvements for policy pertaining to former foster youth looking for housing options. The study included a literature review, a web-based environmental scan, agency surveys, housing site visits, and a research brief. The authors also convened a forum with policymakers, practitioners, and researchers to disseminate study findings. Results from the study indicated that policies and programs offer few housing opportunities for former foster youth, and included implications for future policy and research.

For more information, please see: http://www.huduser.org/portal/publications/pdf/youth_hsg_main_report.pdf


Identifying and Serving LGBTQ Youth: Case Studies of Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grantees, February 2014

The Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services released a report that presents findings on four topics: (1) agencies' collection and use of data on clients' sexual orientation and gender identity, (2) providers' assessment and perceptions of needs and capacities among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) Runaway and Homeless Youth (RHY), (3) providers' approaches to serving LGBTQ RHY, and (4) providers' perceptions of research gaps and data needs related to services for LGBTQ RHY. The purpose of the study was to learn about programs' strategies for identifying and serving LGBTQ RHY, the challenges programs face in understanding and addressing the needs of this population, and potential areas for future research.

For more information, please see: http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/14/lgbt-rhy/rpt_lgbtq_rhy.pdf


America's Young Adults, 2014

The Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics released a special issue report that focuses on youth in transition to adulthood in the United States. The report states that youth in transition often face challenges while trying to achieve financial and social independence, and aims to capture the needs of youth in transition to inform future policy approaches that serve this population.

For more information, please see: http://childstats.gov/pdf/ac2014/YA_14.pdf


The Economic Well-Being of LGB Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, January 2013

The Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services released a brief that explores the characteristics and economic well-being of youth who exit foster care and align themselves with a gay, lesbian, or bisexual (LGB) identity. Their outcomes are compared to youth exiting the program that identify themselves to be heterosexual. The brief pulls data from the Midwest Study of Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth study that sampled these populations from Illinois, Iowa, and Wisconsin.

For more information, please see: https://www.opressrc.org/content/economic-well-being-lgb-youth-transitioning-out-foster-care


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Immigrants and Trafficking

ORR Webinar: Annual Outcome Goal Plan Supplemental Guidance, December 2014

On December 3, 2014, ORR hosted a webinar on the Annual Outcome Goal Plan (AOGP). The AOGP is required annually for of all states and Wilson-Fish agencies The webinar reviews each section of the AOGP, highlighting key points and important details.

Presentation [PDF - 1,050 KB] Transcript [PDF - 35 KB] Audiorecording [WMV - 4,067 KB]


ORR-6 Performance Report: Supplemental Guidance for Completing Schedules A, B, C, and D, November 5, 2014

On November 5, 2014, the Office of Refugee Resettlement hosted a webinar on the ORR-6 Performance Report. The webinar included a review of each section of the ORR-6, highlighting key points and important details, and a question and answer session with ORR personnel.

Audiorecording [WMV - 18,334 KB] Transcript [PDF - 103 KB] PowerPoint Presentations [PDF - 2,519 KB]


Webinar: Models of Collaboration between Workforce Investment and Refugee Resettlement Stakeholders, October 2014

In October 2014, the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) presented a Webinar highlighting each of the organizations featured in the "Models of Collaboration between Workforce Investment and Refugee Resettlement Stakeholders" report. Published by ORR with input from the U.S. Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration, the report highlights three models of collaboration to support refugees in finding employment. Each model contains elements that could be replicated in any number of settings throughout the country. The Webinar featured the following programs:

  • International Institute of St. Louis;
  • Utah Department of Workforce Services; and
  • Sacramento Employment and Training Agency.

Representatives from each organization participated in a discussion highlighting how they help refugees find employment and work towards self-sufficiency.

Transcript [PDF - 167 KB] PowerPoint Presentations [PDF - 390 KB] Audiorecording [WMV - 13,508 KB]


Webinar: Secondary Migration: What Communities are Doing to Ensure Success and Self-Sufficiency for Second Waves of Refugees, September 23, 2014

On September 23, 2014, the Office of Refugee Resettlement hosted the "Secondary Migration: What Communities are Doing to Ensure Success and Self-Sufficiency for Second Waves of Refugees" Webinar. Every year, the United States welcomes more refugees than any other country in the world. Refugees are placed in locations throughout the country where services are available to help with resettlement and integration. For a variety of reasons, some refugees choose to move from the city where they are initially placed, which can present challenges and opportunities for both refugees and providers of public services. This webinar highlighted best practices for supporting refugees that have chosen to move to a new community after initial resettlement. Speakers included:

  • Amy Shir, ORR TA Provider
  • Lewis Kimsey, Kansas State Refugee Coordinator
  • Susan Downs-Karkos, Welcoming America
  • Brenda Zion, formerly of One Morgan County, Colorado

Transcript [PDF - 129 KB]

Webinar Recording [WMV - 14,322 KB]

Powerpoint Presentation [PDF - 1,645 KB]


Webinar: Preparing Refugees for Employment: The ABC's of Understanding the American Workplace – Resources, Tools, and Programs, September 16, 2014

On Tuesday, September 16th, the Office of Refugee Resettlement hosted the "Preparing Refugees for Employment: The ABC's of Understanding the American Workplace – Resources, Tools, and Programs" Webinar. Speakers provided multiple strategies to refugee agencies and programs that support refugees that are navigating and accessing employment and career pathway opportunities. Presenters outlined their program initiatives, how they collaborate across agencies and organizations to best support refugees that are navigating employment/career pathway opportunities, as well as how they work with employers and communities in welcoming refugees. Presenters included:

  • Katherine Dachtler, Grand Forks sub-office Resettlement Coordinator, Lutheran Social Services New Americans
  • Tara Wolfson, Employment and Training Program Manager, Idaho Office for Refugees
  • Lisa Cooper, Co-founder and Consultant, Global Talent Idaho
  • Toni Richardson, Employment Specialist, International Rescue Committee

Transcript [PDF - 186 KB]

Powerpoint Presentation [PDF - 198 KB]

Webinar Recording [WMV - 13,722 KB]


Models of Collaboration between Workforce Investment and Refugee Resettlement Stakeholders, August 2014

The Office of Refugee Resettlement released a report that highlights three models of collaboration to support refugees that are seeking employment. Each model contains elements that could be replicated in any number of settings throughout the country.

For more information, please see: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/orr/models_of_collaboration_between_workforce_investment_and_refugee.pdf


Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Profiles, 2014

The Migration Policy Institute developed a data tool that provides estimates of unauthorized immigrant youth eligible for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). DACA provides short-term deportation relief and work authorization to qualifying immigrant youth and young adults. The data tool includes estimates for 41 States.

For more information, please see: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/programs/data-hub/deferred-action-childhood-arrivals-daca-profiles


Unauthorized Immigrant Population Profiles, 2014

Published by the Migration Policy Institute (MPI), this data tool utilizes methodology in analyzing and presenting data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2008-2012 American Community Survey, as well as the 2008 Survey of Income and Program Participation data. The tool provides information about the current state of immigrants living in the United States and answers lingering questions such as: where they reside, when they arrived, and their countries of origin. In addition, it allows users to view estimates of unauthorized populations for the U.S., 47 States, and the District of Columbia.

For more information, please see: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/programs/us-immigration-policy-program-data-hub/unauthorized-immigrant-population-profiles


Building Sustainable Communities: Immigrants and Mobility in Vermont, July 2013

The Research in Transportation Business & Management Journal published a paper that explores issues faced by refugees in Vermont related to access, transportation, and sustainability. The paper states that the many small, remote communities in Vermont pose a particular challenge for refugees that do not have access to their own forms of transportation. The paper details a community-based study that was conducted using surveys and interviews to document refugee transportation experiences and challenges faced, and used to inform community transportation planning initiatives.

For more information, please see: https://www.opressrc.org/content/building-sustainable-communities-immigrants-and-mobility-vermont


Refugee Economic Self-Sufficiency: An Exploratory Study of Approaches Used in Office of Refugee Resettlement Programs, November 2008

The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation released an exploratory study report that outlines what factors and approaches contribute to refugee economic self-sufficiency. The report also includes the success rate of the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) in getting refugees employed.

For more information, please see: http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/08/RefugeeSelfSuff/report.pdf


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Non-custodial Parents

Strategies To Assist Noncustodial Parents In Improving Economic Well-Being, October 2014

The Administration for Children and Families' Office of Family Assistance (OFA) recently hosted the "Strategies to Assist Noncustodial Parents in Improving Economic Well-Being" webinar that showcased several programs making headway in this area. TANF programs and their safety-net partners increasingly understand the importance of engaging noncustodial parents while also holding them accountable for the economic and social growth of their children. Barriers such as unemployment, underemployment, or incarceration can hinder noncustodial parents from providing for their children even when many want to do so.

The Webinar featured three programs.

  1. North Dakota PRIDE is a partnership between North Dakota's Department of Human Services, Job Service North Dakota, the Child Support Enforcement Division, and eight judicial district courts throughout the state. The program refers parents with unpaid child support obligations to Job Service North Dakota for employment support. Speakers representing this program will be:
    • Carol Cartledge, Director of the Economic Assistance Policy Division, North Dakota Department of Human Services;
    • Terry Peterson, Assistant Director of the Child Support Division, North Dakota Department of Human Services; and
    • Pat Anderson, Program Administrator, Job Service North Dakota.
  2. Kansas Child Support Savings Initiative is a partnership between Kansas Child Support Services and the state Treasurer's Office to empower noncustodial parents to save money for their children's education. Noncustodial parents open 529 savings accounts for their children and for every dollar they put into the account, the State reduces their child support arrears by two dollars. The Speaker representing this program will be:
    • Melissa Johnson, Deputy Director, Child Support Services, Kansas Department for Children and Families.
  3. Couples Advancing Together is a program of the Center for Urban Families in Baltimore, Maryland that provides employment development, case management services, and healthy relationship skills training to couples with children who currently receive public benefits through the Maryland Department of Social Services. Completion of the Couples Advancing Together program qualifies participants for a 10% reduction in any child support arrears they owe to the State of Maryland, which is helpful to those who are noncustodial parents to children outside their primary family unit. Speakers representing this program will be:
    • Joseph T. Jones, Jr., Founder, President & CEO
    • Otis Buckson, CAT Program Manager; and
    • Catherine Pitchford, Client Services Manager, Center for Urban Families.

Webinar Recording [MP3 - 38,366 KB]

Webinar Transcript [PDF - 169 KB]

Powerpoint Presentation [PDF - 1,877 KB]


Child Well-Being and Noncustodial Fathers, February 2013

This report looks at child poverty and the effects family structures have on increasing or decreasing childhood poverty rates. The report suggests that an option to improve the well-being of children in single-mother families is to seek greater financial, social, and parenting contributions from non-custodial fathers. The report highlights the social and economic barriers non-custodial fathers face and social science research on fathers' influences on overall child well-being, as well as reviews tax, welfare and child support policies.

For more information, please see: http://fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R41431.pdf


Kansas 529 Initiative for Noncustodial Parents, 2013

The Assets for Independence (AFI) Resource Center released an article introducing and explaining the 529 plan. The State of Kansas is promoting savings for postsecondary education by offering this unique 529 plan for noncustodial parents. The 529 plans are investment accounts for postsecondary education expenses that may increase in value over time. Contributions to 529 plans may be deducted from income taxes. In the State of Kansas, under the Child Support Savings Incentive (CSSI) Program, eligible noncustodial parents can now open and contribute to 529 savings accounts for their children and receive a reduction in State child support arrears of double the amount deposited. For every one dollar saved towards their education, they receive a reduction in arrears of two dollars.

For more information, please see: http://www.dcf.ks.gov/services/CSS/Pages/529.aspx


Increasing Outreach, Connection, and Services to Low-Income, Non-Custodial Fathers: How Did We Get Here and What Do We Know, April 2012

This paper documents an approach, used in Connecticut, for outreaching, connecting, and serving low-income, ethnically diverse, non-custodial fathers. The approach focuses on engaging men "where they are" by building their strengths and addressing their needs and helping fathers become positive and healthy role models by increasing their attachment to their children and families. The approach focuses on skill development in several areas, including education, economic stability, family/child support, and mental and physical health.

For more information, please see: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4015970/


It's Not All about Money: Non-Financial Ways Non-Custodial Parents Can Help Their Families, 2012

This fact sheet from the National Resource Center for Healthy Marriage and Families offers suggestions for ways that safety-net service providers can help non-custodial parents explore non-financial mechanisms for participating in their children's lives. This would be a helpful resource for TANF case managers to share with participants wishing to be more involved in their children's lives.

For more information, please see: http://tinyurl.com/not-all-about-money-p


Non-Custodial Parent Choices PEER Pilot: Final Impact Report, August 2011

Non-Custodial Parent (NCP) Choices operated a PEER pilot to determine if the addition of a curriculum of parenting classes, relationship skills and financial literacy would enhance the outcomes of their program. This report summarizes findings, and shows that participants in the PEER program utilized the workforce development component of the NCP Choices program at a greater rate than their counterparts in the original program.

For more information, please see: http://www.utexas.edu/research/cshr/pubs/pdf/NCP_Choices_PEER_Sep2011final.pdf


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Substance Abuse/Mental Health

Colorado New Directions for Families, 2014

In Colorado, TANF provides funding to a substance abuse treatment program called New Directions for Families at the Arapahoe House treatment facility. Substance abuse intervention and transitional housing assistance is provided for mothers and their dependent children with a focus on achieving self-sufficiency. In the latter half of the program, employment is emphasized and mothers are expected to be working as they complete treatment.

For more information, please see: https://www.arapahoehouse.org/new-directions-families


Kentucky's Targeted Assessment Program, 2014

Kentucky's Targeted Assessment Program (TAP) is a partnership between the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS) Department for Community Based Services (DCBS) and the University of Kentucky Center on Drug and Alcohol Research to assess and support TANF participants struggling with significant barriers to work, including substance abuse and mental health issues. The model uses specialists who administer a comprehensive assessment designed to fully capture any barriers to work and then collaborate with other systems to engage participants in evidenced based interventions. This program has been in place since 1999.

For more information, please see: http://www.kyequaljustice.org/file/view/TAP+Program+Description+-+SFY+2010.pdf


North Carolina CASAWORKS for Families, 2014

The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University operated a ten year demonstration project from 1997 to 2007 aimed at helping women on TANF recover from substance abuse issues and secure jobs. The outcomes of the demonstration project included 50 percent of participants remaining abstinent from substances during the last six months in the program, employment engagement increased, and TANF receipt decreased by the end of the program. Eleven sites participated in the demonstration project. North Carolina is still currently using this model.

For more information, please see: http://www.ncdhhs.gov/mhddsas/providers/women_child_SA/


Casey Practice Digest: Substance Use Disorders in Families with Young Children, November 2013

This document offers information on substance use and co-occurring disorders through the lens of child welfare and child safety. Information on funding related to the Affordable Care Act is covered as well as understanding substance abuse data, direct practice concepts and evidence based practices and promising interventions currently in use. State and local programs are highlighted for readers.

For more information, please see: http://www.in.gov/children/files/Practice_Digest_Substance_Use_11_13.pdf


Affordability Most Frequent Reason for Not Receiving Mental Health Services, 2013

SAMSHA released a Data Spotlight report addressing the reasons behind why over five million adults every year have an unmet need for mental health care and do not receive mental health services. According to the 2009 to 2011 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), cost/insurance issues were the most frequently mentioned reasons for not receiving mental health services. Unmet mental health needs can have a direct effect on the well-being of the individual, their relationships, and their employment.

For more information, please see: http://www.samhsa.gov/data/spotlight/spot075-services-affordability-2013.pdf


Results from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH): Summary of National Findings, 2013

This report provides the results of a large-scale national survey about the extent of substance abuse and mental health issues in the U.S. In 2012, it was found that approximately 22.2 million people over the age of 12 were dependent on a substance and the three most common substances used were marijuana, pain killers, and cocaine. This data indicated an increase in the number of people abusing pain killers from the previous year.

For more information, please see: http://www.samhsa.gov/data/NSDUH/2012SummNatFindDetTables/NationalFindings/NSDUHresults2012.htm


Co-Occurring Disorders and Integrated Dual Diagnosis Treatment (IDDT) Factsheet, 2012

This factsheet from the National Alliance on Mental Health Minnesota provides an overview of the evidence based practice of IDDT and its use in treating individuals suffering from mental illness and struggling with substance abuse. It offers suggestions of what to look for in an IDDT program and provides a list of programs within Minnesota that offer these services.

For more information, please see: http://www.nami.org/Content/Microsites249/NAMI_Grand_Rapids_Area/Home237/Home289/IDDT-Fact-Sheet_final.pdf


National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices (NREPP), 2012

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), hosts the NREPP. NREPP is a searchable database of evidence-based mental health and substance abuse interventions that are scored on each outcome. Searches can be completed based on a variety of criteria including outcomes, geographic locations, age and treatment setting. Each intervention listing includes contact information for program representatives.

For more information, please see: http://nrepp.samhsa.gov/Search.aspx


Webinar: Using Data to Inform and Guide Services to Persons with Co-Occurring Disorders, April 2011

This webinar features Dr. Mark McGovern, an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and of Community and Family Medicine at Dartmouth Medical School in New Hampshire. Dr. McGovern discusses the use of data to guide decision-making and ascertain progress of a program. He then describes how this information assists with the work and support of people with co-occurring disorders.

For more information, please see: http://media.samhsa.gov/co-occurring/events/usingdata/slide_02.html


Integrated Treatment for Co-Occurring Disorders Evidence-Based Practices (EBP) Kit, 2010

This kit is available from SAMHSA in a DVD/CD-ROM version via mail or sections can be downloaded via the link above. The kit provides practice principles about integrated treatment for co-occurring disorders, an approach that helps people recover by offering mental health and substance abuse services at the same time in one setting. Users are provided suggestions from successful programs.

For more information, please see: http://store.samhsa.gov/product/Integrated-Treatment-for-Co-Occurring-Disorders-Evidence-Based-Practices-EBP-KIT/SMA08-4367


Substance Use Disorders and Employability Among Welfare Recipients, 2010

This document provides the findings from a six year study conducted in New York City on the ability of substance abusing TANF participants to obtain a job and remain employed. It was found that the overwhelming majority of substance abusing participants were not exempted from work requirements due to their substance use. One quarter of participants with substance use issues found and maintained employment. Case management is touched upon as an important component to working with this hard-to-serve population.

For more information, please see: http://www.pacific-gateway.org/substance%20use%20disorders%20and%20employability%20among%20welfare%20recipients.pdf


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Teen Parents

Teenage Girls in the Child Welfare System Report High Rates of Risky Sexual Activity and Pregnancy, June 2014

The Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation released a spotlight report that explores the high rates of sexual activity and pregnancy among teenage girls in the second cohort of the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/sexual_outcomes_spotlight_13.pdf


How States Are Implementing Evidence-Based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Programs through the Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP), April 2014

This brief summarizes a recent report about the PREP program, entitled "The Personal Responsibility Education Program: Launching a Nationwide Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Effort." The report documented key decisions made by state grantees about the design of their PREP programs. Data was collected through telephone interviews with state grantee officials in 44 states and the District of Columbia.

For more information, please see: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/prep_dis_brief_032814_edited.pdf


Reducing Teen Childbearing among Latinos: An Innovative Anti-Poverty Strategy, February 2014

Child Trends recently released a research brief that identifies and outlines promising approaches to reduce early childbearing among Latino adolescents. This work included a review of research studies, a scan of intervention programs, focus groups with adolescents, and interviews with parents, program designers, and program staff, as well as analyses of national databases. The authors synthesize the results across these various research methods to identify major findings and implications for teen pregnancy prevention efforts for Latinos.

For more information, please see: http://www.childtrends.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/2014-04ReducingLatinoTeenChildbearing1.pdf


Dear Colleague Letter: Guidance to Help Schools Better Support Pregnant and Parenting Students' Academic Success, June 2013

The Department of Education has issued a "Dear Colleague" letter and accompanying pamphlet on supporting the academic success of pregnant and parenting students until Title IX. This pamphlet updates and expands upon the pamphlet on this topic issued in 1991. The pamphlet also provides information on school retention problems associated with young mothers and fathers and the requirements related to these issues contained in the Department's regulation implemented in Title IX.

To view the letter, please see: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/letters/colleague-201306-title-ix.pdf

To view the accompanying pamphlet, please see: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/pregnancy.pdf


Expanding the Evidence to Help Teen Moms Make Healthy Choices, May 2013

One of the best ways we can support teen moms is to help them plan their families in a healthy way.

For more information, please see: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/blog/2013/05/expanding-the-evidence-to-help-teen-moms-make-healthy-choices


Collaborative Approaches to Teen Pregnancy Prevention: Public Agencies, Community Partnerships, and Policy Research, 2013

Chapin Hall, at the University of Chicago, hosted this webcast, which provided information to interested stakeholders on pregnancy prevention efforts within the city of Chicago, as well as available Federal funding for efforts throughout the country. Presenters provided information from policy, programmatic, and research perspectives, and a number of practices that are currently working in the field were shared.

For more information, please see: http://www.chapinhall.org/march14forum


Findyouthinfo.gov, 2013

FindYouthInfo.gov was created by the Interagency Working Group on Youth Programs (IWGYP), which is composed of representatives from 12 Federal departments and five Federal agencies that support programs and services focusing on youth. The Web site's purpose is to disseminate promising practices and effective strategies and promote enhanced collaboration for those working with youth and in youth-serving organizations. The Web site features a resource page specifically targeted for teen pregnancy prevention. It allows users to search for information by topic, find local youth programs via a zip code search, search for funding, and explore existing collaborations.



For more information, please see: http://www.findyouthinfo.gov/

To view the Resource Page, please see: http://findyouthinfo.gov/youth-topics/teen-pregnancy-prevention


Podcast: Union City Sustained Youth Development Project Podcast, 2013

In this podcast from the National Clearinghouse on Families and Youth, Karl Kallgren, director of the Union City Sustained Youth Development Project, discusses the youth program that has helped teen pregnancy rates drop by 20 percent in a rural Pennsylvania community.

For more information, please see: http://findyouthinfo.gov/federal-link/interview-director-union-city-sustained-youth-development-project


Replicating Evidence-Based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Programs: A Case Study, 2013

This video was filmed during the Emphasizing Evidence Based Programs for Children and Youth Forum which occurred in April 2012 in Washington D.C. It features a presentation from Amy Margolis, Public Health Advisor with the Office of Adolescent Health (OAH), who highlighted evidence based programs that were found via OAH-funded research. OAH is currently funding grantees to replicate these evidence-based programs across the country.

To view this video, please see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Rt9sM-bskw&list=PLC9DFA0A549C0F23C&index=2


A Ramsey County-TANF Partnership to Improve Teen Family Outcomes, 2012

This article appears in an annual report compiled by the Center for Early Childhood Development at the University of Minnesota on coordinating systems for better child outcomes. It highlights a partnership that Ramsey County, Minnesota developed between their TANF program and their existing public health nurse home visiting program. The subsequent program model streamlines the TANF system for teen parents and provides for in-home and school- based services and supports for teen parents as they plan to attend higher education or enter the workforce after graduation or GED completion. The program boasts increased positive birth outcomes and high school/GED completion rates for teens involved in this program versus their uninvolved counterparts.

For more information, please see: https://www.cehd.umn.edu/CEED/publications/earlyreport/earlyreportfall2012.pdf#page=15


Promising Strategies and Existing Gaps in Supporting Pregnant and Parenting Teens, 2012

This report summarizes two meetings held in 2012 with expert panels that discussed ways to enhance the knowledge of promising practices when working with pregnant and parenting teens. The expert gatherings were hosted by the Office of Adolescent Health, within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In addition to existing promising practices, effective program components and examples of these components are given for those working with pregnant and parenting teens.

For more information, please see: http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah/resources-and-publications/info/Assets/paf_expert_panel_rpt_2012.pdf


Preventing Pregnancy Among Older Teens, 2011

This issue brief, authored by the National Conference of State Legislatures, examines the needs surrounding older teens who experience unintended pregnancies. Community colleges see a high dropout rate for women who attend and then become pregnant, highlighting the fact that unplanned pregnancies often derail educational goals. An overview of Federal funding provided to States to prevent and address unplanned pregnancies is provided.

For more information, please see: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/policymakers/PDF/NCSL_PreventingPregnancy_5.13.11.pdf


Second Chance Homes: A Resource for Teen Mothers, 2011

This issue brief authored by Child Trends, examines Second Chance Homes, a newer program model, similar to maternity group homes. They serve young, unmarried mothers who can no longer live at home with their own parent. These young women are at high risk for becoming homeless, and the Second Chance Homes offer a supportive environment for raising their child(ren) while encouraging (often requiring) mothers to finish high school or obtain a GED, learn life skills, and develop parenting skills. The Administration for Children and Families provides funding for these homes through the TANF block grant, as well as other funding sources. This type of program could be a relevant referral and potential partner for TANF agencies seeking to better serve teen parents.

For more information, please see: http://www.childtrends.org/Files/Child_Trends-2011_04_15_RB_2ndChanceHomes.pdf


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